Treatment Severe Seborrheic Dermatitis Scalp

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for seborrheic dermatitis?
    I have severe seborrheic dermatitis (scalp) and I have tried everything over the counter and nothing works. I finally went to the dermatologist 2 weeks ago and he prescribed Loprox shampoo, and it has made my hair even more itchy and scaly! I called the office to get them to change my prescription and he said to give it more time. Is it supposed to get worse before it gets better? What are you prescribed to? Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      i went to a dremotologist and they to me to use a shampoo with zinc or syclic acid...and they also gave me a foam for hair i guess,....and then two other things for my face personally i dont think it should get worse i mean it shoud kindof take time to like work but yeh...aslso if it says on the lable stop use if condtion worsens then that could also be an indiccator....also when i had it i also look at my diet and really changed it....i think u should read article about subboric dermatitis...thats what did and tahts why when i went to my dermatologist i knew what to ask and stuff i have had my bad days where it seems like i have really dry skin ...hope u feel better:)

  2. QUESTION:
    How much is the cost of laser treatments for scalp dermatitis seborrheic in NYC?
    How many sections is needed to complete the treatment.

    • ANSWER:
      I don't think you can get laser treatments for seborrheic scalp dermatitis -- they would have to shave your head in order for the laser to reach the skin on your scalp. You need to use prescription shampoos to treat seborrheic dermatitis, like Nizoral 2%. You can also try an over-the-counter shampoo, like Sebulex if your hair is extremely oily. I've never even heard of anyone using laser treatments for seborrheic dermatitis. Seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp is really just severe dandruff.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are the differences of sclap psoriasis and Seborrhoeic Eczema?
    1) What are the differences of sclap psoriasis and Seborrhoeic Eczema (on sclap) ?
    2) Can you same treatments for both conditions ?
    3) Out of the two sclap conditions, Which is worst to have?
    4) Do they go away after teenage pubrity?

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is a condition that has a red appearance and severe flakes-like snow flakes. It is often in patches and on the back of the scalp. People also get it on the body-elbows, hands and feet are common areas. You treat it with topical steroids- anti itch products. Theres many rx foams, oils and sprays. You need a derm to prescribe strong meds. Theres also other treatments like laser, pills and injections.

      The other condition I think your referring to is seborrheic dermatitis. It is the medical term for dandruff. itching and mild scaling- not the red thick scaly patches like psoriasis. You use typical head and shoulders shampoos, TGEL, TSAL etc. and topical steroids like psoriasis.

      Thenthreesepsoriasisis. which is both toether. Its dandruff with much thicker scale, almost looking like psoriasis. Treatments are the same-topical steroids.

      All three are common chronic conditions-meaning you can deal with them forever and find the rightreatmentsts to manage it. You caDevelopop it any time of life and psoriasis is prob the worse to have. It has a more crazy itch and because you flake all over clothing its ofteembarrassingng and harder to treat

  4. QUESTION:
    What are the differences between sclap psoriasis and Seborrhoeic Eczema?
    What are the differences between sclap psoriasis and Seborrhoeic Eczema?
    1) What are the differences of sclap psoriasis and Seborrhoeic Eczema (on sclap) ?
    2) Can you same treatments for both conditions ?
    3) Out of the two sclap conditions, Which is worst to have?
    4) Do they go away after teenage pubrity?

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrheic eczema, (or dermatitis) involves the scalp, eyelids, nose and lips and is associated the the presence of pityrosporum yeasts, and is common in patients with AIDs.
      Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease in which itchy scaly red patches form on the elbows, forearms, knees, legs, and scalp, and other parts of the body. Psoriasis is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting about 2% of the population, but its cause is not known. The disorder often runs in families and may be brought on by anxiety; it is rare in infants and the elderly, the most common time of onset being is childhood or adolescence. It sometimes occurs in association with arthritis (psoriatic arthritis). Occassionally, the disease may be very severe, affecting much of the skin and causing considerable disability in the patient. While psychological stress may cause an exacerbation of psoriasis, the only significant event that precipitates the disease is a preceding streptocccal infection. Drugs such as lithium or beta blockers may occasionally be responsible.

  5. QUESTION:
    Why would a healthy young womens hair be falling out?
    My sister has been diagnosed with Eczema due to all the peeling a severe dryness to her head, ears, neck, and hands. She has been seeing the same Doctor for a year now and about 2 months ago she noticed her hair has been falling out and it has been a real devestating time for her. She can't seem to find any answers. What do u think is the best way to find treatment and even a correct diagnosis?
    She ha been seeing a derm. for a year. They tell her its eczema.
    Stress could be why its getting worse because she is worried about her hair lol.
    I dont believe it has an odor, see she is only 25 and married with NO children. And no she doesnt live by a nucleur plant lol
    Thx for all the advise guys :) I really hope she gets better because i hate to see her go through so much devistation.

    • ANSWER:
      I think she suffers from alopecia, Seborrheic dermatitis, or eczema, is often associated with diffuse hair thinning and greasy, yellow scales on the scalp. Treatment usually involves tar shampoo and topical steroids. Read more on the link I've given.

      Certain treatments can also cause alopecia or baldness. Consult a dermatologist, I found certain cures for alopecia as I found out in TV, these are using a hair regrower shampoo, or have a hair transplant... or in some derm clinics, they sew a wig on the head... its better you go to a dermatology when it comes to this matters.

  6. QUESTION:
    What are these little bumps all over my skinnnn?
    they're mostly on my torso, back, and chest. some of them itch and some don't. we dont have fleas. annnd yeah. they make my body look retarded. so. what is it?

    • ANSWER:
      The location, appearance and color of a rash will help your doctor make a diagnosis. Look for care suggestions on this chart for common rashes and other skin conditions.

      SYMPTOMSDIAGNOSISSELF-CARE

      1. Is your face, chest or back covered in small, pus-filled sacs or pimples, blackheads or sore, red bumps?This may be ACNE, a common skin problem that often begins in adolescence.See your doctor if over-the-counter acne treatments, such as benzoyl peroxide, don't help. Gently washing your face with mild soap on a regular basis may be helpful. Sometimes prescription medicines, such as an antibiotic, may be prescribed by your doctor.

      2. Do you have a flushed appearance, perhaps with redness around your cheeks, chin, forehead or nose?
      This may be ROSACEA, a skin disease that affects the face.

      Treatment isn't usually needed, but antibiotics may be useful for moderate to severe symptoms.

      3. Do you have a painful red bump or a cluster of painful red bumps?This could be a BOIL. A cluster of boils is called a CARBUNCLE. These occur due to infection under the skin.Gently compress the boil with a warm cloth. Use antibiotic ointments if needed. Call your doctor if the boils don't come to a head, open and drain, or if the redness spreads.

      4. Do you have a small, boil-like infection around a hair shaft or pore?This could be FOLLICULITIS, an infection of the hair follicle.Most of these will heal on their own. Clean the area. Use antibiotic ointments if needed. See your doctor if the condition worsens or doesn't improve.

      5. Do you have red, tender and swollen areas of skin, perhaps around a cut or scrape?This could be CELLULITIS, an infection of the skin.Clean the area carefully with soap and water and apply an antibiotic ointment. Call your doctor if redness and pain increase.

      6. Do you have red, itchy bumps on your skin, and are they sprinkled randomly?These could be INSECT BITES.These aren't usually harmful. Use hydrocortisone cream, antihistamine and ice to relieve itching. If symptoms get worse or don't clear up, call your doctor. If new symptoms arise, such as difficulty breathing, dizziness or nausea, go to the emergency room right away.

      7. Do you have irregular, raised or flat red sores that appeared after taking medicine?This could be an ALLERGIC REACTION to the medicine.Call your doctor. Try an antihistamine for itching and rash.

      8. Have bumps formed suddenly on your face or body?These could be HIVES, a skin reaction to an allergen, medicine or infection. They can also appear in some people who are very nervous.Use an antihistamine and cool compresses for itching. If the hives don't go away on their own or are accompanied by other symptoms, such as swelling around the lips or trouble breathing, see your doctor or go to the emergency room right away.

      9. Do you have a red, itchy, scaly and oily rash, and does it affect the areas around your eyebrows, nose or the edge of your scalp?Go to Question 12.*

      10. Is the person an adult?This could be a sign of SEBORRHEIC DERMATITIS, a condition in which the sebaceous glands overproduce.
      Try using hydrocortisone cream or selenium sulfide shampoo on the sore areas. See your doctor if the symptoms continue or spread.

      11. Is the person a child and does the dry, scaly skin cover the head?This could be CRADLE CAP, a form of seborrhea in infants.Try gently scrubbing the scales to remove them. Hydrocortisone cream may also help. See your doctor if the rash doesn't go away or if the hair doesn't grow in that area.

      *12. Do you have a red, scaling rash, and did it begin after contact with clothing, jewelry or perfume?This could be IRRITANT CONTACT DERMATITIS. It's caused by a reaction to detergents, perfumes and other substances.Avoid whatever you think caused the symptoms and treat the area with hydrocortisone cream or other soothing lotions.

      13. Do you have a red, itchy rash, and are blisters forming?This could be ALLERGIC CONTACT DERMATITIS, caused by POISON IVY, poison oak or poison sumac. The oil from these plants causes an ALLERGIC REACTION.Wash the area with soap and water to remove any oil that remains on the skin. The rash will go away after about a week. To relieve itching, apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to the rash. See your doctor if the rash covers a large area of your body, does not go away, or if new symptoms, such as fever, appear .

      14. Are there red, swollen, tender bumps in your armpits or other areas where hair grows?This could be HIDRADENITIS SUPPURATIVA, inflammation of the sweat glands.See your doctor. Avoid using antiperspirants and deodorants.

      15. Do you have small red dots on your skin, or larger, bruise-like spots that appeared after taking medicine?This could be ALLERGIC PURPURA, a serious allergic reaction to a medicine, such as an antibiotic that can cause bleeding.See you

  7. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid of dandruff?
    Is there a way I can reduce the amount I have quickly? i dont have too much but it is noticeable i do have some.

    • ANSWER:
      Dandruff scales are visible flakes of skin that are continuously shed from the scalp. People with dandruff have large numbers of a superficial fungus, the yeast Pityrosporum ovale, on the scalp, which increases the turnover of the skin flakes.

      Do’s of Dandruff Care
      If the dandruff is mild, shampoo hair twice a week with shampoos labeled “frequent use, for dry hair and scalp”. The moisturizers will protect the scalp and keep it from flaking.
      Use shampoo powders with camellia seeds for mild cases
      Moderate dandruff sufferers use a normal antidandruff shampoo daily or alternate days, leaving the lather on for at least 10 minutes. Be sure to rinse thoroughly; shampoo and soap residue can actually aggravate skin problems. Once the dandruff is under control, shift to weekly twice shampooing.
      For more severe dandruff, you should use shampoos containing anti-yeast medications like selenium sulfide, ketoconazole, climbazole etc. These should be used on alternate days in the first week, twice a week for next 2-4 weeks, thereafter once weekly.
      After bath towel off the excess water and let the hair dry naturally, that is without blow drying.
      Brush the scalp hair with a soft natural bristle brush. Firmly brush the hair from scalp outwards. This will distribute the oil along the hair shaft keeping it shiny and healthy; rather than remaining on the scalp where it is a good medium for the yeast to multiply.
      Hair should be washed daily, with shampoo used on alternate days to begin with and weekly once or twice as maintenance.
      Eat well balanced food, avoid snacks, get 7-8 hours good sleep and exercise regularly.
      Learn to relax on a regular basis.
      If the condition persists or worsens after treatment, stop all medications and see a dermatologist.
      Don’ts of Dandruff Care
      Do not use ordinary soap to wash hair. Ordinary soap is not designed to cleanse the scalp and hair.
      Do not wash hair intensively, this can irritate the scalp and increase the cell turn over and flakes.
      Do not use antidandruff shampoos in mild, dry type of dandruff. This will actually compound the problem.
      Avoid dyes on the scalp hair as far as possible. The normal resident bacteria of the scalp which keeps away the yeasts will be destroyed by dyes and harsh shampoos.
      Do not use antidandruff shampoos daily after the dandruff clears, as these are too harsh. Use no more than once or twice a week.
      Moderate and severe types of dandruff are oily type; avoid oily and greasy applications in such cases.
      Do not consume alcohol, fried, spicy, fast food.
      When to See a Dermatologist?
      You should consult a dermatologist

      If the OTC antidandruff treatment and home remedies have not helped even after 6 weeks.
      If the flaking and scaling are not over the whole scalp but just in one or more places, and thick. You may be suffering from psoriasis or seborrheic dermatitis.
      If you have scabs on the scalp.
      If your scalp is red and itchy - or if the skin is flaky around the eyebrows, round the nose, behind the ears, front of chest or in between the shoulder blades;- this may suggest you have the more severe Seborrheic Dermatitis.
      Dandruff, Seborrheic Dermatitis and Psoriasis: Are They Related?
      Dandruff may be considered as the mildest end of a disease spectrum where psoriasis is at the other, more severe, end; with seborrheic dermatitis coming in between. The immunological and histo-chemical changes seen in psoriasis has not yet been demonstrated in the milder forms and yeast infection is not considered an important trigger of psoriasis, though. Response to many topical agents like tar is similar in this group. There is a severe condition which comes in between seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis of the scalp which has aptly been called seborrheasis

  8. QUESTION:
    What shampoo is best for eczema?
    My 13 month old daughter is having a severe eczema break out. I'm just curious what shampoo is the best for her. I already use Dove Unscented for her body, Aquaphor after the bath, and Tide Free for detergent. I'm just looking for something for her scalp. She has been digging at it and I can't seem to find anything to help. Thanks!
    And yes she has been off the bottle and formula since 8 months of age.

    • ANSWER:
      Don't use anything strong, go with as mild as possible. You could try Johnson's baby shampoo but it is scented and sometimes that can irritate eczema more. I am thinking that you could try Cetaphil wash - it is a very thick lotion-type cleanser made unscented and for sensitive skin and skin with problems like eczema. It is totally not irritating and dermatologists recommend it all the time. I use it and it is the mildest thing I have ever used, and it will even help moisturize her scalp after you have rinsed it off. If that does not help, I would suggest consulting a dermatologist, as she may also have cradle cap or seborrheic dermatitis, etc., where she may need to have a specific shampoo for treatment.

  9. QUESTION:
    How can I tell which type of eczema I have?
    I know there are several types and was wondering what the differences are between them all so I can tell which type I have.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common type of eczema is atopic eczema. Atopic eczema rash is marked by dryness thickening, excoriation, and even scarring. This chronic condition is not contagious; the cause is hereditary and usually begins in infancy as a rash on the scalp, face or upper extremities of the baby. Atopic eczema is most commonly located in areas where the body bends or experiences contact thus creating friction that can cause eczema. Causes of atopic eczema include soap, harsh chemicals, heat and humidity, stress, certain foods (most common offenders include eggs, milk, wheat, soy protein, and peanut). Many of these ingredients can turn up in unusual places, such as all-natural soaps, makeup, cream or lotions. Inhalant allergens such as house dust mites, pets, pollen and cut grass are also triggers that can cause eczema.

      Seborrheic eczema is most commonly associated with flaking and sometimes redness of the skin. This occurs when there is inflammation of the skin where sebaceous glands are concentrated. This type of eczema rash can affect the face, chest, eyebrows and eyelids, nose, ears, chin, forehead, and most commonly affects the scalp. The symptoms can be unpleasant, unattractive, and uncomfortable especially during the winter months when there is less sunlight. Seborrheic eczema begins with dry or greasy scaling of the scalp areas, which become red, oily and may possibly cause itching. It is often thought of as a severe case of dandruff accompanied at times by an odor, which is caused by the buildup of bacteria on the scalp.

      Perioral dermatitis is an eczema rash that affects mostly women. This rash usually occurs as redness around the mouth, the symptoms of perioral dermatitis may also include small red bumps or even pus bumps and mild peeling. Treatments include using a non-tartar, non-fluoride toothpaste. Lip balms, lipstick, mouthwash or toothpaste can also cause perioral dermatitis.

      Contact eczema is an inflammatory response by the skin to an outside allergen or irritant. This type of eczema rash is caused by an allergic reaction through contact with an irritant. Substances that cause contact eczema include household items, clothing, cosmetics, and plants. The types of substance that cause the symptoms to appear can further define contact eczema. A substance that has a direct toxic effect or exposure to an irritant produces irritant contact eczema and a skin reaction can occur immediately or gradually after repeat exposure. Examples of substances that cause irritant contact eczema include acids, certain toilet bowl cleaners or drain cleaners, oven cleaners, detergents, ammonia, lye, cement, turpentine, and paint thinners. Allergic contact eczema will trigger an immunologic response that causes inflammation called a skin allergy. Examples of substances that cause allergic contact eczema include poison ivy, poison sumac, poison oak, dyes, fragrances, leather, rubber compounds (gloves and shoes) and nickel (jewelry accessories). Itching and burning are common symptoms in both types of contact dermatitis. Typically the symptoms of contact dermatitis include redness, swelling and oozing. If left untreated, contact dermatitis can result in dry, thickened, cracked skin. The webs of the fingers, back of the hands and forearms are common sites of contact. Local contact with an allergen followed by exposure to ultraviolet radiation (sunlight) can cause photo allergic eczema rash.

      The symptoms of dyshidrotic eczema include itching of the hands and feet, which can cause a sudden onset of blisters. Symptoms of this rash include burning pain or itching may be experienced before blisters appear. The cause of dyshidrotic eczema may be sensitivity to nickel or other metals such as chromium or cobalt, also fragrances, fungal infection, stress, aspirin, oral contraceptives, smoking, and implanted metals. Dyshidrotic eczema is a form of hand eczema, which is more common in women and starts on the sides of the fingers as itchy little bumps and then develops into a rash. Dyshidrotic eczema may affect only the feet. Some patients have involvement of both hands and feet. It takes a long time for skin to recover, and unless you're careful, the dermatitis will reoccur. The symptoms of hand eczema include red, itchy, scaly, cracked skin with blisters up to one inch in diameter, usually on the palms of the hands. Dentists are prone to hand eczema. The cause of hand eczema is usually a combination of sensitive skin and irritation or an allergic reaction from materials touched. Prevention and avoidance can be a powerful treatment. The following suggestions will be helpful for anyone with symptoms of hand eczema: wear waterproof or cotton-lined gloves, avoid contact with soaps, detergents, scouring powders, and irritating chemicals. Wear waterproof gloves when peeling or squeezing lemons, oranges, or grapefruit, peeling potatoes, or handling tomatoes. Wear heavy-duty gloves while gardening, wash dishes in a dishwasher,

  10. QUESTION:
    What is the best cream to use on a 5 wk old for dermitis???
    the Dr told me sorboline - no perfum -

    • ANSWER:
      There are three common rashes that babies can have in the first few months of life. Baby acne is very common and usually starts by about 3 weeks of age. In baby acne, you see red bumps that look like pimples. The bumps are on the cheeks, forehead, and temples. They do not cause any discomfort to the baby, though it often can look very distressing to parents. No treatment is needed for infant acne. It occurs because of the hormonal changes that are occurring in the baby after birth, and will go away on its own in several weeks. You don't need to put any special creams or lotions on it, and you definitely want to avoid any acne products made for teenagers and adults.

      Another common rash at this age is seborrhea, also known as seborrheic dermatitis. It usually starts by one month of age. When you begin to notice red bumps (usually smaller than the pimples of acne) and yellow crusty scales and flakes on the hair-bearing areas of the body, such as the eyebrows, eyelashes, and scalp. It also tends to affect the neck and shoulder. Its cause is not entirely clear, though it may be related to eczema. This is what it sounds like your baby has, given the yellow crusts that you describe on the eyebrows. It is not caused by allergy to what she is eating, and the breastfeeding is not contributing to it. While it will go away by itself eventually, it can be treated with certain types of steroid-based creams, if necessary.

      Infant eczema is also very common. It usually starts between 1 and 5 months of age. In eczema, you have red bumps and patches in various locations. Eczema often affects both cheeks, on the face only, but it can be much more diffuse, and some babies will have the rash all over as they get older. While it's true that some babies with bad eczema have allergies such as to milk, in the majority of infants a specific cause cannot be found, other than a tendency to have dry skin. Some infants who have eczema outgrow it as they get older, while others continue to have problems with it throughout childhood. Eczema is treated with moisturizing agents, and if it's severe, may also need to be treated with steroid creams or other prescription ointments.

      Mention the rash to your baby's doctor at her next visit. If it doesn't seem to be disappearing on its own, or it seems to worsen, I reccomend that you have the rash checked.

  11. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have any suggestions on how to get rid of dandruff besides using dandruff shampoo?

    • ANSWER:
      The only treatment that doesn't require shampooing or using medication from a dermatologist may be shaving one's head bald. This is an extreme treatment for dandruff, but all the the bald people I know don't seem to suffer from dandruff.

      Dandruff
      From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      Dandruff (also called scurf and historically termed Pityriasis capitis) is due to the excessive shedding of dead skin cells from the scalp. As it is normal for skin cells to die and flake off, a small amount of flaking is normal and in fact quite common. Some people, however, either chronically or as a result of certain triggers, experience an unusually large amount of flaking, which can also be accompanied by redness and irritation. Most cases of dandruff can be easily treated with specialized shampoos. Simple dandruff does not cause hair loss.

      Excessive flaking can also be a symptom of seborrhoeic dermatitis, psoriasis, fungal infection or excoriation associated with infestation of head lice. Dandruff is a global phenomenon and many people find that dandruff can cause social or self-esteem problems. Treatment can be important for purely social reasons.

      Contents [hide]
      1 Causes
      2 Seborrheic dermatitis
      3 Treatment
      4 Misconceptions
      5 References

      [edit] Causes
      As the epidermal layer continually replaces itself, cells are pushed outward where they eventually die and flake off. In most people, these flakes of skin are too small to be visible. However, certain conditions cause cell turnover to be unusually rapid, especially in the scalp. For people with dandruff, skin cells may mature and be shed in 2 - 7 days, as opposed to around a month in people without dandruff. The result is that dead skin cells are shed in large, oily clumps, which appear as white or grayish patches on the scalp and clothes.

      Dandruff has been shown to be the result of three required factors:

      1. Skin oil commonly referred to as sebum or sebaceous secretions;
      2. The metabolic by-products of skin micro-organisms (most specifically Malassezia yeasts);
      3. an individual susceptibility.
      Common older literature cites the fungus Malassezia furfur (previously known as Pityrosporum ovale) as the cause of dandruff. While this fungus is found naturally on the skin surface of both healthy people and those with dandruff, it has recently been shown that a scalp specific fungus, Malassezi Globosa, is the responsible agent. This fungus metabolizes triglycerides present in sebum by the expression of lipase, resulting in a lipid byproduct oleic acid (OA). Penetration by OA of the top layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum, results in an inflammatory response which disturbs homeostasis and results in erratic cleavage of straum corneum cells.

      Rarely, dandruff can be a manifestation of an allergic reaction to chemicals in hair gels/sprays, hair oils, or sometimes even dandruff medications like Ketoconazole.

      There is no convincing evidence that food (such as sugar or yeast), excessive perspiration, or climate have any role in the pathogenesis of dandruff.

      There have been many strategies for the control of dandruff. Simply increasing shampooing will remove flakes. However, elimination of the fungus results in dramatic improvement. Regular shampooing with an anti-fungal product will not only treat but prevent recurrence.

      Sitting next to Alex Logan can also cause dandruff.

      [edit] Seborrheic dermatitis
      Flaking is a symptom of seborrheic dermatitis. Joseph Bark notes that "Redness and itching is actually seborrheic dermatitis, and it frequently occurs around the folds of the nose and the eyebrow areas, not just the scalp." Dry, thick, well-defined lesions consisting of large, silvery scales may be traced to the less common psoriasis of the scalp.

      Seasonal changes, stress, and immuno-suppression seem to affect seborrheic dermatitis.

      [edit] Treatment
      Severe forms of flaking if accompanied by flaking or scaling on other parts of the body, might best be treated by a dermatologist.
      Head & Shoulders anti-dandruff shampoo containing active ingredient Zinc pyrithione. [citation needed]
      Nizoral Shampoo anti-fungal/anti-dandruff shampoo containing active ingredient Ketoconazole.
      Selsun Blue anti-dandruff shampoo containing active ingredient Selenium sulfide.
      The antifungal properties of Tea Tree Oil (Melaleuca Oil) have been reported as useful in the treatment of dandruff. [1] [2] [3]
      Washing hair with rubbing alcohol gets rid of the dandruff and leaves hair feeling soft and clean. [citation needed]
      Tar containing shampoos are also used for treatment of dandruff. [4]
      Apple Cider Vinegar helps destroy the bacteria that causes Dandruff thus, eliminating your dandruff. [citation needed]

      [edit] Misconceptions
      Dandruff is sometimes confused with dried shampoo. This usually occurs when hair isn't rinsed properly.
      Dandruff is not an organism like lice; it is just dead skin that accumulates in the scalp.
      Dandruff is unlikely to be the cause of hair loss.

      [edit] References
      Margen, Sheldon, M.D. "Wellnessfoods A to Z." Rebus Press, ISBN 0-929661-70-2
      Thomas L. Dawson Jr. (2006) Malassezia and seborrheic dermatitis: etiology and treatment. J Cosmet Sci. 57(2):181-2.
      Roma Batra, Teun Boekhout, Eveline Guého, F. Javier Cabañes, Thomas L. Dawson, Jr., and Aditya K. Gupta (2005) Malassezia Baillon, emerging clinical yeasts. FEMS Yeast Research 5:1101-1103.
      Yvonne M. DeAngelis, Christina M. Gemmer, Joseph R. Kaczvinsky, Dianna Kenneally, James Schwartz, and Thomas L. Dawson, Jr. (2005) Three etiologic facets of dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis: Malassezia fungi, Sebaceous lipids, and Individual sensitivity. J Invest Dermatol. Symp Proc 10:295-297.
      Byung In Ro, and Thomas L. Dawson, Jr. (2005) The Role of Sebaceous Gland Activity and Scalp Microfloral Metabolism in the Etiology of Common Scalp Conditions. J Invest Dermatol. Symp Proc 10:194 –197.
      Aditya K Gupta, Roma Batra, Robyn Bluhm HBSc, Teun Boekhout, and Thomas L. Dawson, Jr. (2004) Skin diseases associated with Malassezia species. J Am Acad Dermatol 51:785-98.
      Gemmer, Christina, Yvonne DeAngelis, Bart Theelen, Teun Boekhout, and Thomas L. Dawson, Jr (2002) A fast, non-invasive method for identification and speciation of Malassezia, and it application to dandruff biology. J. Clin. Micro., 40 (9): 3350-3357.
      Warner, R., Ying Boissy, James R. Schwartz, and Thomas L. Dawson, Jr (2001) Dandruff has an altered stratum corneum ultrastructure that is improved with Zinc Pyrithione shampoo. JAAD, 45 (6-1): 897-903.
      Ashbee HR, Evans EG. Immunology of diseases associated with Malassezia species. Clin Microbiol Rev 2002;15:21-57.
      Bulmer AC, Bulmer GS. The antifungal action of dandruff shampoos. Mycopathologia 1999;147:63-5.
      Kligman AM. Perspectives and problems in cutaneous gerontology. J Invest Dermatol 1979;73:39-46.
      McGrath J, Murphy GM. The control of seborrhoeic dermatitis and dandruff by antipityrosporal drugs. Drugs 1991;41:178-84.
      Pierard-Franchimont C, Hermanns JF, Degreef H, Pierard GE. From axioms to new insights into dandruff. Dermatology 2000;200:93-8.
      Priestley GC, Savin JA. The microbiology of dandruff. Br J Dermatol 1976;94:469-71.
      Faergemann J. Seborrheic Dermatits (Dandruff). New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc.; 2000. p. 197-202.
      Shuster S. The aetiology of dandruff and the mode of action of therapeutic agents. Br J Dermatol 1984;111:235-42.
      Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dandruff"

  12. QUESTION:
    What causes dandruff and how can one treat it?

    • ANSWER:
      There are many different types of scalp conditions, and most people think that they are all "dandruff."

      However, some of the different issues are:
      a) product build up that flakes
      b) dry scalp that flakes (lack of conditioning or too much styling product build up that cause flaking)
      c) Seborrheic dermatitis - is a skin disorder affecting the scalp, face and trunk causing scaly, flaky, itchy, red skin. It particularly affects the sebum-gland rich areas of skin. This can be brought on by stress, potentially yeast, or hormones.
      d) Psoriasis - is a disease which affects the skin and joints. It commonly causes red scaly patches to appear on the skin. The scaly patches caused by psoriasis, called psoriatic plaques, are areas of inflammation and excessive skin production. Skin rapidly accumulates at these sites and takes a silvery-white appearance. Plaques frequently occur on the skin of the elbows and knees, but can affect any area including the scalp and genitals. This can be brought on by stress or hormones.

      -Dry scalp can simply be treated with a conditioning shampoo & conditioner. Preferably salon professional products.
      -Seborrhoeic Dermatitis can be treated with medicated shampoos. For severe cases, dermatologists can prescibe prescription strength shampoos & scalp treatments.
      -Psoriasis requires prescription strength shampoos & treatments from a dermatologist.

  13. QUESTION:
    How do you cure seborrheicn dermatitis? Has anyone experienced hair loss from it??
    I've tried tea tree oil, black soap, olive oil, sulphur, camphor, even some prescriptions and they haven't worked fully. I need more ideas!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting areas of the head and trunk where sebaceous glands are most prominent. Lipophilic yeasts of the Malassezia genus, as well as genetic, environmental and general health factors, contribute to this disorder. Scalp seborrhea varies from mild dandruff to dense, diffuse, adherent scale. Facial and trunk seborrhea is characterized by powdery or greasy scale in skin folds and along hair margins. Treatment options include application of selenium sulfide, pyrithione zinc or ketoconazole-containing shampoos, topical ketoconazole cream or terbinafine solution, topical sodium sulfacetamide and topical corticosteroids

      Pharmacologic treatment options for seborrheic dermatitis include antifungal preparations (selenium sulfide, pyrithione zinc, azole agents, sodium sulfacetamide and topical terbinafine) that decrease colonization by lipophilic yeast and anti-inflammatory agents (topical steroids). Suggested products are listed in Table 1. For severe disease, keratolytics such as salicylic acid or coal tar preparations may be used to remove dense scale; then topical steroids may be applied. Other options for removing adherent scale involve applying any of a variety of oils (peanut, olive or mineral) to soften the scale overnight, followed by use of a detergent or coal tar shampoo.

      As a last resort in refractory disease, sebosuppressive agents such as isotretinoin (Accutane) may be used to reduce sebaceous gland activity.

  14. QUESTION:
    my scalp is cakey, oily, and smelly..what's causing my scalp to be like this, i wash my?
    hair every day...

    After i shampoo, my scalp is still greasy and when i scrap my finger nail across the scalp, there's white cakey stuff under my nails...yuk

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrheic Dermatitis

      Seborrheic dermatitis is a common, chronic condition that affects people at all ages from infancy through middle age; however, the two peak periods of occurrence are in the first 3 months of life when seborrheic dermatitis is known as “cradle cap”, and from approximately ages 30 to 70 years.

      The most prominent features of seborrheic dermatitis are (1) excessive oiliness of scalp and hair, (2) greasy, yellowish scales that grow into crusts covering red, inflamed, moist scalp skin, and (3) intense itching. In more severe cases the condition involves the eyebrows, cheeks, and folds of the nose. The intense itchiness may encourage hard scratching that will enhance inflammation and open the way to secondary infection by bacteria, yeasts or fungi. The more severe forms of seborrheic dermatitis can closely resemble psoriasis, and may even overlap in a condition called sebopsoriasis. The cause of seborrheic dermatitis is not known.

      Of the three conditions—mild dandruff, seborrhea, and seborrheic dermatitis—seborrheic dermatitis is likely to be the most severe and should usually be diagnosed and treated by a dermatologist or other physician experienced in the treatment of skin disease. Treatment of seborrheic dermatitis usually includes daily to twice-weekly shampoos with a product recommended by the patient’s physician. Additional forms of treatment depend upon the severity of disease. as diagnosed by a physician. Although not curable, seborrheic dermatitis is very treatable and can usually be cleared with regular use of prescribed treatments.

      If not, look into other scalp conditions, make sure you wash your hair with a citrus shampoo and shampoo twice to ensure all the dirt is removed! Don't be too rough when shampooing your scalp as you can stimulate your oil producing gland to produce more oil and that'll give you greasier hair! Only apply conditioner to the ends!

  15. QUESTION:
    I have a condition on my scalp. It is itchy, red , and I also have flaking. I have tried all kinds of?
    of shampoos and I have been trying not to scratch it when it itches-but nothing helps any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like you may have seborrheic dermatitis, which is basically severe dandruff. Normal shampoos won't help at all, and even dandruff shampoos only help for a little while. You should go see your doctor and discuss cortizone treatments.

      Basically dandruff and dermatitis conditions are caused by increased sensitivity to certain agents in the environment, including bacteria that are on everyone's skin but not everyone is sensitive to them. Certain shampoos with active agents like selenium sulfide or tar can help reduce the irritation, and treatments like cortizone can change how your cells react to the environmental agents.

      If you get no relief from your symptoms whatsoever, even after shampooing with dandruff shampoo, then you may have some other condition. In any event, a trip to the doctor, or a special visit to a dermatologist, should be high on your to-do list.

  16. QUESTION:
    Woke up to a swollen face and small red splotches all over.....?
    I'm itchy randomly, and I don't know why. If its an allergic reaction, I don't know what it would be too. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      I hope this chart can give you some information. If not go to the emergency room ASAP.beforee it gets worse. Here is the link or look at infor below. Good luck

      http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/tools/symptom/545.html

      SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS SELF-CARE

      1. Is your face, chest or back covered in small, pus-filled sacs or pimples, blackheads or sore, red bumps? This may be ACNE, a common skin problem that often begins in adolescence. See your doctor if over-the-counter acne treatments, such as benzoyl peroxide, don't help. Gently washing your face with mild soap on a regular basis may be helpful. Sometimes prescription medicines, such as an antibiotic, may be prescribed by your doctor.

      2. Do you have a flushed appearance, perhaps with redness around your cheeks, chin, forehead or nose? This may be ROSACEA, a skin disease that affects the face.
      Treatment isn't usually needed, but antibiotics may be useful for moderate to severe symptoms.

      3. Do you have a painful red bump or a cluster of painful red bumps? This could be a BOIL. A cluster of boils is called a CARBUNCLE. These occur due to infection under the skin. Gently compress the boil with a warm cloth. Use antibiotic ointments if needed. Call your doctor if the boils don't come to a head, open and drain, or if the redness spreads.

      4. Do you have a small, boil-like infection around a hair shaft or pore? This could be FOLLICULITIS, an infection of the hair follicle. Most of these will heal on their own. Clean the area. Use antibiotic ointments if needed. See your doctor if the condition worsens or doesn't improve.

      5. Do you have red, tender and swollen areas of skin, perhaps around a cut or scrape? This could be CELLULITIS, an infection of the skin. Clean the area carefully with soap and water and apply an antibiotic ointment. Call your doctor if redness and pain increase.

      6. Do you have red, itchy bumps on your skin, and are they sprinkled randomly? These could be INSECT BITES. These aren't usually harmful. Use hydrocortisone cream, antihistamine and ice to relieve itching. If symptoms get worse or don't clear up, call your doctor. If new symptoms arise, such as difficulty breathing, dizziness or nausea, go to the emergency room right away.

      7. Do you have irregular, raised or flat red sores that appeared after taking medicine? This could be an ALLERGIC REACTION to the medicine. Call your doctor. Try an antihistamine for itching and rash.

      8. Have bumps formed suddenly on your face or body? These could be HIVES, a skin reaction to an allergen, medicine or infection. They can also appear in some people who are very nervous. Use an antihistamine and cool compresses for itching. If the hives don't go away on their own or are accompanied by other symptoms, such as swelling around the lips or trouble breathing, see your doctor or go to the emergency room right away.

      9. Do you have a red, itchy, scaly and oily rash, and does it affect the areas around your eyebrows, nose or the edge of your scalp? Go to Question 12.*

      10. Is the person an adult? This could be a sign of SEBORRHEIC DERMATITIS, a condition in which the sebaceous glands overproduce. Try using hydrocortisone cream or selenium sulfide shampoo on the sore areas. See your doctor if the symptoms continue or spread.

      11. Is the person a child and does the dry, scaly skin cover the head? This could be CRADLE CAP, a form of seborrhea in infants. Try gently scrubbing the scales to remove them. Hydrocortisone cream may also help. See your doctor if the rash doesn't go away or if the hair doesn't grow in that area.

      *12. Do you have a red, scaling rash, and did it begin after contact with clothing, jewelry or perfume? This could be IRRITANT CONTACT DERMATITIS. It's caused by a reaction to detergents, perfumes and other substances. Avoid whatever you think caused the symptoms and treat the area with hydrocortisone cream or other soothing lotions.

      13. Do you have a red, itchy rash, and are blisters forming? This could be ALLERGIC CONTACT DERMATITIS, caused by POISON IVY, poison oak or poison sumac. The oil from these plants causes an ALLERGIC REACTION. Wash the area with soap and water to remove any oil that remains on the skin. The rash will go away after about a week. To relieve itching, apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to the rash. See your doctor if the rash covers a large area of your body, does not go away, or if new symptoms, such as fever, appear .

      14. Are there red, swollen, tender bumps in your armpits or other areas where hair grows? This could be HIDRADENITIS SUPPURATIVA, inflammation of the sweat glands. See your doctor. Avoid using antiperspirants and deodorants.

      15. Do you have small red dots on your skin, or larger, bruise-like spots that appeared after taking medicine? This could be ALLERGIC PURPURA, a serious

  17. QUESTION:
    Home remedies for seborrheic dermatitis (aka cradle cap)?
    I am 20 years, active and in college and have recently developed a terrible bout of seborrheic dermatitis. It is causing me severe discomfort and my hair to fall out. I was wondering if anyone knows of any good treatments for it.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      buy some baby oil, and apply a rather liberal amount to your scalp about a half hour before taking a bath. Rub it in then let it soak in really good. make sure you are using a moisturising shampoo & conditioner. for severe cases, do it at least three times a week.
      That is what i do with my residents at my job, when they have S.D. It will usually clear up in about two to three weeks depending on how bad it is. Then I maintain it by using Neutrogena T/Gel or by adding a drop or two of baby oil in their hair as i shampoo then follow with a regular shampoo and conditioning. T/GEL works great, but It smells medicinal so my residents prefer the baby oil instead.

  18. QUESTION:
    What are the main causes of dandruff?

    • ANSWER:
      What Is Dandruff? What Are The Symptoms Of Dandruff?
      Dandruff, also known as scurf or Pityriasis simplex capillitii, affects the scalp and causes flakes of skin to appear - it is a common condition. Our skin cells are forever renewing themselves. When the skin cells on our scalp are renewed the old ones are pushed to the surface and out of the scalp. For a person with dandruff the renewal is faster, meaning more dead skin is shed, making the dandruff more noticeable. Dandruff can also occur if the scalp is frequently exposed to extreme temperatures.

      Dandruff can be chronical (long-term) or the result of certain triggers. People with dandruff may also experience irritation and redness on the scalp.

      Excessive flaking may be caused by an underlying illness or condition, such as psoriasis, a fungal infection (Malassezia), seborrheic dermatitis, or even head lice.

      Some individuals with severe dandruff may have social or self-esteem problems. Therefore, treatment may be important for both physiological and psychological reasons.

      The word dandruff comes from (most likely) dand (origin unknown) and E. Anglian (England) dialect huff, hurf, meaning "scab". This is probably linked to the Old Norse word hrufa, meaning "scab". The Old High German word hruf means "scurf".

      According to MediLexicon's medical dictionary, dandruff is:

      The presence, in varying amounts, of white or gray scales in the hair of the scalp, due to excessive or normal branny exfoliation of the epidermis.

      A myth - some people think their dandruff is caused by their scalp being too dry. They try to deal with this by not washing their hair with shampoo, or wash it less often, believing that washing worsens the problem. This is a myth (not true). Dandruff differs from a dry scalp in that it usually gets better when you shampoo more frequently (with the right shampoos).

      A significant number of people with dandruff find it improves as they get older.

      It is estimated that about 50% of people in Western Europe and North America suffer from dandruff.

      Dandruff is more common in men than in women, and in people with oily skin.

      Some studies have suggested that diets that are too salty, sugary or spicy and accompanied by excessive alcohol may exacerbate dandruff.

      Dandruff does not contribute to hair loss.
      Seborrheic dermatitis
      This is a skin condition in which the skin becomes inflamed or flaky. Seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp is a severe form of dandruff. When it affects the scalp most people refer to it as dandruff. When babies have it, it is referred to as cradle cap. Seborrheic dermatitis causes larger, greasier flakes than most other types of dandruff. Seborrheic dermatitis affects not only the scalp, but the skin in other parts of the body too.

  19. QUESTION:
    What is dandruff and what causes it ?

    • ANSWER:
      Dandruff (also called scurf and historicaly termed Pityriasis capitis) is due to the excessive shedding of dead skin cells from the scalp. As it is normal for skin cells to die and flake off, a small amount of flaking is normal and in fact quite common. Some people, however, either chronically or as a result of certain triggers, experience an unusually large amount of flaking, which can also be accompanied by redness and irritation. Most cases of dandruff can be easily treated with specialized shampoos.

      Excessive flaking can also be a symptom of seborrhoeic dermatitis, psoriasis, fungal infection or excoriation associated with infestation head lice. Dandruff is a global phenomenon and many people find that dandruff can causes social or self-esteem problems. Treatment can be important for purely social reasons.

      CAUSES
      As the epidermal layer continually replaces itself, cells are pushed outward where they eventually die and flake off. In most people, these flakes of skin are too small to be visible. However, certain conditions cause cell turnover to be unusually rapid, especially common in the scalp. In people with dandruff, skin cells may be sequestered in 2 - 7 days, as opposed to around a month in people without dandruff. The result is that dead skin cells are shed in large clumps, which appear as small, white or grayish patches on the scalp.

      Dandruff is the result of a combination of three essential components. These are sebum, a skin commensal Malassezia Globosa and individual susceptibility.

      The literature cites the fungus Malassezia furfur (previously known as Pityrosporum ovale) as the cause of dandruff. Whilst this fungus is found naturally on the skin surface of both healthy people and those with dandruff it has recently been shown that a scalp specific fungus Malassezi Globosa is the responsible agent. This fungus metabolizes triglycerides present in sebum by the expression of lipase, resulting in a lipid byproduct oleic acid (OA). Penetration by OA of the top layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum, results in an inflammatory response which disturbs homeostasis and results in erratic cleavage of straum corneum cells. There is no convincing evidence that food, excessive perspiration or climate have any role in the pathogenesis of dandruff.

      There have been many strategies for the control of dandruff. Simply increasing shampooing will remove flakes. However, elimination of the fungus results in dramatic improvement. Regular shampooing with an anti-fungal product will not only treat but prevent recurrence. Head & Shoulders in which the active ingredient is pyrithione zinc or Nizoral (Ketoconazole) are highly effective. The former can be used daily, the latter is restricted to three times a week. Although coal tar and other less expensive shampoo choices may be used as a first attempt for milder forms, they are unpleasant to use and do not have the cosmetic benefits of Head & Shoulders. Coal tar has been in increasing disfavor in the United States due to suspected carcinogenic properties.

      Flaking is a symptom of seborrheic dermatitis. Joseph Bark notes that "Redness and itching is actually seborrheic dermatitis, and it frequently occurs around the folds of the nose and the eyebrow areas, not just the scalp." Dry, thick, well-defined lesions consisting of large, silvery scales may be traced to the less common psoriasis of the scalp.

      Seasonal changes, stress, and immuno-suppression seem to affect seborrheic dermatitis. Simple dandruff does not cause hair loss.

      Severe forms of flaking if accompanied by flaking or scaling on other parts of the body, might best be treated by a dermatologist.

      The antifungal properties of Tea Tree Oil (Melaleuca Oil) have been reported as useful in the treatment of dandruff.

      Misconceptions(false)
      Dandruff is sometimes confused with dried shampoo. This usually occurs when hair isn't rinsed properly.
      Dandruff is not an organism like lice; it is just dead skin that accumulates in the scalp.

  20. QUESTION:
    how do i get rid of my dandruff?

    • ANSWER:
      DANDRUFF
      Dandruff (Pityriasis capitis) is the excessive flaking of dead skin that forms on the scalp. As it is normal for skin cells to die and flake off, a small amount of flaking is normal and in fact quite common. Some people, however, either chronically or as a result of certain triggers, experience an unusually large amount of flaking, which can be not only a visual nuisance, but is also often accompanied by redness and irritation. Most cases of dandruff can be treated with the proper shampoo.

      Dandruff can also be a symptom of seborrheic dermatitis, psoriasis, fungal infection or head lice. Excessive scratching should be avoided. Scratching to the point of causing breaks in the skin can increase the risk for infections, particularly from staph and strep bacteria.

      CAUSES
      As skin grows, epidermal cells are pushed outward where they eventually die and flake off the body. In most people, these flakes of skin are too small to be visible. However, certain conditions cause cell turnover to be unusually rapid, especially common in the scalp. In people with dandruff, skin cells may die and be replaced about once every two weeks, as opposed to around once a month in healthy people. The result is that dead skin cells are shed in large clumps, which appear as small, unsightly white or grayish patches on the scalp.

      Dandruff is understood to be the result of a combination of factors. Some of these factors are well studied, whereas others have not been thoroughly investigated.

      The most common cause of dandruff is probably the fungus Malassezia furfur (previously known as Pityrosporum ovale). This fungus is found naturally on the skin surface of both healthy people and those with dandruff. The fungus likes fat, and is consequently found most on skin areas with many sebaceous glands: on the scalp, face and upper part of the body. When Malassezia furfur grows too rapidly, the natural renewal of cells is disturbed and dandruff appears with itching. Other fungi may have a similar role in causing dandruff, as may certain bacteria.

      TREATMENTS
      The appearance of flakes can be reduced, especially in those who suffer from only a mild case of dandruff, by proper hair care. Some people mistakenly avoid washing their hair, believing that the drying effect of shampoo will worsen their dandruff. By washing the hair regularly, however, dead skin is in fact removed before it can build up into larger, more noticeable flakes. Using acid-based shampoos helps restore acidity to the scalp, breaking down oils and preventing dead skin cells from collecting into visible clumps. However, shampoos with milder medication, or shampoos that are not marked to treat seborrheic dermatitis, may have little to no effect on redness and irritation.

      There are shampoo brands available specifically for those who have dandruff. The gold standard of treatment is a tar shampoo that contains salicylic acid. Other less effective products are Head & Shoulders, which contains zinc pyrithione, Selsun Blue which contains selenium sulfide, Neutrogena, T/Gel, which contains coal tar; and various generic products with the same active ingredients. For more persistent or severe dandruff, as well as dandruff due to seborrheic dermatitis, shampoo containing 1% or 2% ketoconazole, such as Nizoral, can be used. These anti-dandruff ingredients are either fungicides, which kill the Malassezia furfur fungus, or acids which break down the oils on the scalp that lead to visible clumping of dead skin flakes. Household remedies to get rid of dandruff are apple cider vinegar, salt or lemon juice.

      Severe forms of dandruff, particularly if accompanied by flaking or scaling on other parts of the body, should be treated by a dermatologist. Dandruff can occur in conjuction with skin conditions such as seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis.

      Dandruff varies from person to person. It may be necessary to try various shampoos with different active ingredients (selenium sulfide, tar, salicylic acid, zinc pyrithione, ketoconazole) to find the best suited for any one individual.

      Furthermore, Tea tree oil's antifungal activity has been found useful in the treatment of dandruff

  21. QUESTION:
    Seborrheic Dermatitis?
    My girl friend was diagnosed with Seborrheic Dermatitis on her scalp and neck hairline, but the medication prescribed isn't working (Triamcinolone Acetonide). She can't afford to go back to the doctor's. Do you recognize the pictures a something other than SD?
    And do you know an alternative medication (store bought) that might help?

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/31047299@N04/
    Hope the pics are good enough... click on them to see them better.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      In my opinion the best place is where you get the most helpful answers.

      Perhaps if I remind you of the seborrhoeic dermatitis background, (oops... we spell seborrheic with an extra 'o' in the UK). There are two major requisites for someone to get this problem.

      First, you need your scalp and facial skin to be more than normally greasy or oily. This is because the rash and the irritation of seb. derm., is caused by irritating breakdown-products of natural human skin-grease.

      Secondly, you need a particular type of skin infection with a yeast germ. This yeast 'eats' skin grease as its main diet-item, and after the yeast has had a go at it, the post-digestion grease is irritating to the skin.

      These two form the basis for treating the condition.

      First, the skin will probably get less oily or greasy as one moves away from adolescence and gets older, but in the meantime the only practical way of giving the yeast less grease to eat, is to wash the hair more often than normal. A 'detergent' type shampoo is best for this, in my experience, - - and although it doesn't sound at all 'intuitive,' the UK washing-up liquid called 'Fairy Liquid' is good, because it's just marvelous at getting rid of grease. There's no reason you can't apply a conditioner afterward. I admit to (a) using this myself, and (b) having more success in persuading men to try this, than women :- ) Anyway, wash more frequently with something to keep the scalp-grease down.

      Next, there are inflammation-suppressing drugs which damp down the redness, soreness and itching. Triamcinolone acetonide (if it's a pure cream), is just this, - - a pure steroid or 'cortisone' cream. Triamcinolone is a very powerful steroid cream.

      I'm surprised because in the UK, triamcinolone would not be used 'pure' for this condition. It would at least be mixed with an anti- yeast antibiotic, to help kill off the yeast responsible.

      The yeast- antibiotics which are effective against this yeast, include keto-con-azole ('Nizoral') shampoo, and selenium sulphide ('Selsun') shampoo. The '-azole' drugs are sometimes given by mouth for severe infections, on prescription.

      The first answerer mentions sulfur, which can be helpful, - - and there are also tar shampoos, - - 'Polytar' is an older remedy, and pre-dates the '-azole' shampoos.

      I am afraid I think that Triamcinolone alone, will not cure this condition, because it acts neither against the excess grease, nor against the infective yeast germ.

      You are right to consider the possibility that the diagnosis is incorrect, as a reason why the treatment hasn't worked.

      I have looked at your pictures, which are fine, and I think that seborrheic dermatitis is a very likely diagnosis. Alternatives might include ringworm ('Tinea') of the scalp and neck, - - but usually the 'ringworm' fungus produces only a single patch of rash, not a number of similar rashes spread out. Plus we have a doctor's opinion, - I take it, - one who has no doubt seen lots of rashes.

      Greasy "dandruff" is very characteristic of seborrheic dermatitis. Does she have this? Here is a pic of bad seb. derm. dandruff http://www.pgbeautyscience.com/wcd/downloads/seborrheic-dermatitis.jpg

      Another possibility for an edge-of-the-hair rash might be psoriasis, as in this picture, http://content.revolutionhealth.com/contentimages/images-image_popup-ans7_psoriasis.jpg But your pics don't seem very much like that, and I take it there are no psoriasis rashes on the backs of the elbows like here, http://www.aafp.org/afp/20060215/636_f3.jpg ..... or on the fronts of the knees like here, http://www.visualdxhealth.com/images/dx/webAdult/psoriasis_219_lg.jpg

      Your pics are good, but not as good as someone looking at the problem direct in person.

      If I am right about it being seb. derm., I might also be right in expecting some traces of rash in the other 'usual' places in which seborrheic rash occurs. Full-blown Seborrheic Dermatitis is a body-wide condition, - - as an excessively greasy skin is a body-wide condition, - - but even then only in certain places, - -

      The other 'usual' places are, the sides of the nose, as in this picture, http://www.visualdxhealth.com/images/dx/webChild/seborrheicDermatitis_44878_lg.jpg , ... and also in this adult picture http://www.skincareguide.ca/images/glossary/seborrheic_dermatitis.jpg Note the yellow greasy scales on a sore red background.

      The ears as in this picture, http://www.visualdxhealth.com/images/dx/webAdult/seborrheicDermatitis_51212_lg.jpg

      The front of the breast-bone is characteristic, I'm afraid I can't locate a pic, - - but a single dry itchy patch over the breast bone is almost diagnostic of seborrheic dermatitis.

      I am afraid that once you have seborrhoeic dermatitis, it tends to come and go over a long period of time. It is a bit like having acne, you just have to keep it under control.

      The keys to keeping it under control, I re-iterate, are to de-grease the scalp more regularly than normal, and then to apply things to the scalp regularly to kill off the yeast. Nizoral and Selsun shampoos are good, in my opinion.

      People with long-term seborrhoeic dermatitis, also like using a mild acid- and alcohol- based scalp lotion. I suggest this tentatively, as I think your girlfriend's scalp is probably much too sore for this at the moment!!

      Doctors use one called, "2% salicylic acid lotion in 25% industrial methylated spirit." The acid helps by dissolving greasy scales (which are a feature in this condition, also called 'dandruff,'), and the alcohol works by killing off the yeast on the hairs and scalp.

      You recall the 'good samaritan' in the bible, dressed the victim's wounds with wine and vinegar, - - same idea of bug-killing alcohol and acid.

      A good home-made version, when the scalp is less sore, is made by getting some clear white vinegar, (contains 5% acetic acid), and some clear vodka, (40% alcohol). Mix in the proportions of 2 parts clear vinegar to one part vodka, in a plastic bottle. Then dilute to half-strength with an equal amount of tap water. You end up with a home-made scalp lotion which is about 2% acetic acid and 10% alcohol. Apply to scalp and hair at night and allow to dry. Wash off next morning, and style as usual.

      I confess to having used this myself for years, I find it works very well. I have it in a small plastic spray-bottle, with a larger plastic topping-up bottle. It stings a bit when you first put it on, that is normal. The vinegar smell tends to vanish when it dries. I finish drying the hair with a blow-drier, (remembering that pure alcohol is inflammable), and then put a little smelly cologne on.

      Don't stop the washing and shampooing when it is better, it will come back. Just reduce the frequency.

      I hope this is of some help, anyway. A doctor's lifetime experience of having seborrheic dermatitis.

      Best wishes,

      Belliger (retired uk gp)

  22. QUESTION:
    Seborrheic Dermatitis spreading?
    I have a severe case of what I suspect to be Seborrheic Dermatitis covering most of my scalp. I've had this condition through most of Highschool, and I am a senior now. It is easy to hide because I have big bushy thick hair. I have noticed a red flaky patch on my eye brow and also behind my ear. I figure it has to all tie together. Another thing I've noticed is a red patch ( not itchy ) 'below the waist' area.. on the tip. not too noticeable but I don't want it to get any worse. Please help?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, you can try one of the natural treatments from the Internet - some of them do actually work. For my seb derm. on scalp I use herbal cream by Champori quite successfully. It takes just a couple of weeks to clear the spots and they stay clear for months on end.
      Try it: champori is available without prescription and comes with money back guarantee so if it doesn't work for you - it's free.

  23. QUESTION:
    Corticosteroids and Seborrheic dermatitis.?
    Hi, I am currently 24 years old and suffer from seborrheic dermatitis since I was 17. At first it wasn't really severe and didn't know what it was so I didn't take any medications or precautions. After it started to get worse my father took me to a dermatologist who gave me some corticosteroids and told me to go back a month later. Since the lotion really helped my case and me not being informed about it's sever side effects on long term use, I started to buy the medication every time I had finished the tube. This happened over the course of 2 years and I didn't really develop any severe side effects, except for acne (which I had a year of severe acne) but my skin was free of flares and irritation. I linked the acne to the lotion since I had never suffered acne before but I'm not really sure since many people get acne in high school. I then became aware of the severity of long term use and was really depressed when I stopped using it and my dermatitis came back after a few weeks stronger than ever, covering large parts of the face and scalp. I then went to another dermatologist who recommended I use the topical cream Elidel, and was told I could use it regularly since it didn't have any reported side effects. I always buy this product in Mexico (I live in the border) since it is dirt cheap and it is the exact same product, brand and everything. It has become a habit ever since, and I cannot stop using it for a week or so without flaring up again. While in use it really helps me and my skin is great, it is oily and shiny sometimes but I prefer that over the redness and dryness of dermatitis. I recently found out that Elidel has been linked to skin cancer and other skin diseases and that it now has a black box stating it's warnings on the us product, which I didn't know since the mexican product doesn't contain this warning. I now have years of use and I wonder if the couple of years of corticosteroids and the other years of Elidel can sum up to a future skin disaster. I am now again very frustrated since it has been my only door to a normal life. Well I would appreciate any info on the subject, and if anybody out there with this condition has any tips I would really really appreciate it. By the way I am now considering homeopathic treatment but we'll see how that goes. Thanks and God bless.

    • ANSWER:
      I found a few really good sites on Seborrheic dermatitis, and the first link is REALLY interesting and is something you should try, which is to wash your face with dandruff shampoo (the last site recommends that as well). The first site explains it much better than I can here.

      The second link is a good overall article about it, with a few good hints about adjusting your diet and so on.

      The last link is a medical site, pictures and so on, and has a list of all the medications that can be used to treat it.

      There are a surprising number of options that are open to you, don't give up hope.

  24. QUESTION:
    how to get rid of dandruff?
    My 12 year old sister has dandruff.

    It isn't severe, but it is a lot.

    How should I get it off?

    Also, there is a lot on her eyebrow, how to get the dandruff on the eyebrows off?

    Thankss guys! (:

    • ANSWER:
      Dandruff is of two types:
      •Waxy dandruff – it occurs the epidermis scales which is mixed with the sebum that stick to the scalp in the form of patches.
      •Dry dandruff – in this, small white flakes of scalp falls or may get attached to the skin of head.

      TREATMENT
      ~ The appearance of flakes can be reduced, especially in those who suffer from only a mild case of dandruff, by proper hair care. Some people mistakenly avoid washing their hair, believing that the drying effect of shampoo will worsen their dandruff. By washing the hair regularly, however, dead skin is in fact removed before it can build up into larger, more noticeable flakes.

      ~ Using acid-based shampoos helps restore acidity to the scalp, breaking down oils and preventing dead skin cells from collecting into visible clumps. However, shampoos with milder medication, or shampoos that are not marked to treat seborrheic dermatitis, may have little to no effect on redness and irritation.

      ~ There are shampoo brands available specifically for those who have dandruff. The gold standard of treatment is a tar shampoo that contains salicylic acid.

      ~Other less effective products are Head & Shoulders, which contains zinc pyrithione, Selsun Blue which contains selenium sulfide, Neutrogena, T/Gel, which contains coal tar; and various generic products with the same active ingredients.

      ~ Severe forms of dandruff, particularly if accompanied by flaking or scaling on other parts of the body, should be treated by a dermatologist. Dandruff can occur in conjuction with skin conditions such as seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis.

      ~ Dandruff varies from person to person. It may be necessary to try various shampoos with different active ingredients (selenium sulfide, tar, salicylic acid, zinc pyrithione, ketoconazole) to find the best suited for any one individual.

      ~ Furthermore, tea tree oil's anti fungal activity has been found useful in the treatment of dandruff.

      ~ I recommend Dove anti dandruff shampoo and conditioner for best results.

      Home Remedies

      •Hot stream bath especially on the scalp is highly beneficial.

      •Massage of warm olive or sesame oil and then wrap a warm cloth or a towel on head for few minutes is very helpful in getting rid of dandruff.

      •For getting rid of dandruff apply peel of lime immersed in coconut milk or oil heated naturally by leaving it in sunshine for ten days.

      •Apply hot olive oil or sesame oil on the scalp at bed time. Now an hour prior to the bathing rub lime juice mixed with the cosmetic vinegar on the scalp. Wash and rinse your hairs properly. For the last rinse use lime juice and warm water. Follow this process for about 3 months twice a week. This will surely help in relieving from dandruff.

      •Massage the scalp with almond and olive oil for five minutes, leave it for some time and then rinse off to get the dandruff free hairs.

      •Final rinsing of hairs with the cider vinegar after applying a herbal shampoo also relieves from dandruff.

      •Applying two table spoon of cosmetic vinegar and six table spoon of hot water on the scalp with the help of cotton swab and leave it over night. After that wash it with herbal or a mild baby shampoo.

      •Giving sufficient exposure of sun to the scalp is another important method of getting rid of dandruff.

      •Applying gently warm coconut oil mixed with one hundredth of black pepper is very good remedy for treating dandruff.

      •Beet root crushed in henna paste is good in preventing dandruff and hair fall when applied on head.

      •Beet root juice mixed with cider vinegar and ginger juice is very helpful in treating dandruff.

      •Juice of snake gourd is very effective treatment in curing dandruff when rubbed gently on the scalp.

      •Fenugreek seeds are soaked in water and let undisturbed overnight. Now these seeds are grind ed and applied on scalp gently. Leave it for 45 minutes. Then rinse off with the help of shikakai or ritha.

      •Massaging hairs with curd mixed with lime juice and amla (Indian goose berry) before going to bed is a good method of relieving from situations of hair fall and dandruff.

      •Washing hairs with powder of green gram is also good to prevent dandruff.

      •Last rinse with the lime juice is beneficial for hair fall an dandruff condition.

      •Avoid using red meat, sweets, strong coffees and teas, candies, aerated drinks like Pepsi and coke, pickles and spices.

      •One should be very particular about the diet and should stress on food stuff like fresh fruits, vegetables, sprouted seeds, raw nuts and cereals.

      •Massaging of pure apple juice and thrice the quantity of warm water is good treatment of fading away dandruff.

      ~ For dandruff , the recommended treatment of choice is shampoo of KETOCONAZOLE,an anti fungal agent marked in india with the commercial names i.e. shampoo NIZRAL by a good brand. It should be applied thrice a week untill danuntildisappears. Dandruff will disapear without any side effect.use DOVE sham

  25. QUESTION:
    Extremely flaky and itchy scalp. (not just dandruff). Need remedies home and/or pharmaceutical.?
    I am asking for my wife. Very dry, flaky, and itchy, almost scale-like at times. Standard dandruff shampoo doesnt work. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      doctor answering.

      i'm not going on much information here but it sounds like she might have something called seborrheic dermatitis which actually is dandruff. it just might be more severe. (i happen to have this and it drives me a little crazy at times). a dry scaly scalp can also be other things like psoriasis. if you have tried regular dandruff shampoo, then i'd move on to medicated shampoo with coal tar.. they sell it next to the head and shoulders stuff. it comes in various strengths. give that a try for a couple weeks. sometimes the treatment takes a little while to settle the irritation.
      i'd say try that first. if that doesn't work. go the a doctor so they can take a look.. if it is psoriasis they may be able to prescribe additional medication.

      i hope this helps some.

  26. QUESTION:
    how to get rid of dandruff?
    i have severe dandruff head n shoulders, t-gel, olive oil, does not work. its so bad just clumps all over my scalp in the front n back , just all over...help!!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Geanine,

      Dandruff actually called Pityriasis Simplex Capillitis is caused by a fungus (yeast) called Malassezia globosa (previously thought to be caused by Malassezia furfur however this was shown to be incorrect in 2007). This fungus actually eats triglycerides (fats) that are found in sebum (the oil we feel on our skin is sebum). When the fungus eats these triglycerides, a byproduct is formed called oleic acid which penetrates the top layer of skin called stratum corneum which results in inflammation. Just some extra information oleic acid is found in olive oil, this is why the old wives tale of putting olive oil in the hair can make it worse. Also the word oleic comes from the word olive. The importance of this inflammations is that YES it leads to itching as well as flaking (or shedding if you want to call it that) of this top layer of skin, that would be the white flecks you see. This skin condition is also known by Seborrheic Dermatitis and must be treated by using anti-fungal creams and/or shampoos (or lotions) in people that cannot control the problem with the use of selenium which is found in most dandruff shampoos (head and shoulders, Selsun Blue etc). So in addition to selenium and anti-fungals (called "imidazole family ketoconazole being the most often used) there is also some other ingredients used such as coal tar (it is something added in the shampoo or lotion, it is not actually tar like what is used in asphalt), salicylic acid (key ingredient in aspirin, also used for acne) and finally zinc pyrithione and even in some cases corticosteroids which decrease inflammation and with less inflammation you get less itching and shedding of the skin.

      Keep in mind that psoriasis of the scalp can also behave very similarly but it is usually more localized to a certain area of the scalp.

      Before getting into the treatment remember that it takes time, however you should see some improvement within about 7 days. Also keep in mind the problem is NOT the hair but the scalp. What I mean is you need to apply this product TO THE SCALP. This means massaging the shampoo into the scalp. You must also remember that once you have taken care of the dandruff you might need to keep using either the same product or something similar to maintain the scalp healthy. The best and quickest treatment is ketoconazole based products. A good shampoo with that is Nizoral. You may not be able to find it or even in some cases require a prescription. A good maintenance shampoo is Selsun Blue which has Selenium and Zinc (two of the treatment methods) or T/Gel which has Coal Tar. Head and Shoulders Intensive Treatment uses Selenium which is another option (and cheaper one at that).

      I wish you the best, dandruff is a really common problem and can be a real pain to treat. Like I said give it about a week with the Nizoral (ketoconazole is key ingredient) and after complete removal of the dandruff continue at least for a month with a maintenance shampoo such as Selsun Blue, Head and Shoulders intensive treatment or T/Gel (sort of expensive by the way). Remember to massage the scalp and to use it every day. Avoid adding more things to your hair for some time this includes gels, mouse, hairspray etc as it may aggravate the inflammation causing even more dandruff to appear. Also keep in mind that the problem may come back and in that case I suggest once it has been treated again with Nizoral to go back to maintenance shampoos for life. If you see worsening of the condition within 1-2 months go see your physician for stronger products.

      Dan MD

  27. QUESTION:
    Embarrassing hair problem?
    I have dandruff and I've used like every dandruff shampoo out there and some of them reduce it, but none really get rid of it. It's really bad. What causes this and is there any treatment that can prevent it before it starts? Also, dandruff shampoo really makes my hair look like crap.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common cause of dandruff is probably the fungus Malassezia furfur (previously known as Pityrosporum ovale). This fungus is found naturally on the skin surface of both healthy people and those with dandruff. The fungus likes fat, and is consequently found most on skin areas with many sebaceous glands: on the scalp, face and upper part of the body. When Malassezia furfur grows too rapidly, the natural renewal of cells is disturbed and dandruff appears with itching. Other fungi may have a similar role in causing dandruff, as may certain bacteria.
      There is a common misconception that dandruff is caused by a dry scalp, or the drying effect of excessive shampooing. In fact, the opposite is true: people with oily scalps tend to suffer most from dandruff. According to Joseph P. Bark, M.D., chairman of dermatology at St. Joseph's Hospital in Lexington, KY, "this may be due to an oily scalp supporting the growth of yeast in the scalp, which is thought to be instrumental in the development of scaling and scalp irritation." He adds that "a large preponderance of males have dandruff, which may suggest some role of androgen hormones in dandruff."
      Mild dandruff may be caused by overactive sebaceous glands. Other causative factors include family history, food allergies, excessive perspiration, use of alkaline soaps, yeast infections, and stress. Even the season of the year can contribute to the problem: Cold, dry winters are notorious for bringing on dandruff or making it worse. Symptoms of dandruff can also be aggravated by exposure to dust, UV light, harsh shampoos, and hair dyes.
      Dandruff is sometimes the symptom of a more serious condition. If dandruff flakes are greasy and yellow, the probable cause is the skin condition known as seborrheic dermatitis. Redness and itching is actually seborrheic dermatitis, and it frequently occurs around the folds of the nose and the eyebrow areas, not just the scalp. Dry, thick lesions consisting of large, silvery scales may be traced to the less common psoriasis of the scalp.
      Seasonal changes, stress, and certain diseases seem to affect seborrheic dermatitis. The cold, dry air of fall and winter often triggers a flare-up. Emotional stress can worsen the condition as well.
      There is speculation that dandruff is linked with hair loss, as dandruff may indicate an unhealthy scalp.
      Dandruff can in some cases be linked to poor nutrition particularly deficiencies in the mineral zinc.
      There are shampoos available specifically for those who have dandruff. Head & Shoulders, which contains zinc pyrithione, Selsun Blue which contains selenium sulfide, Neutrogena T/Gel, which contains wood tar; and various generic products with the same active ingredients. For more persistent or severe dandruff, as well as dandruff due to seborrhoeic dermatitis, shampoo containing 1% or 2% ketoconazole, such as Nizoral, can be used. These anti-dandruff ingredients are either fungicides, which kill the Malassezia furfur fungus, or they are acidic and breakdown the oils on your scalp that lead to visible clumping of dead skin flakes. Household remedies to get rid of dandruff are apple cider vinegar and lemon juice.
      Severe forms of dandruff, particularly if accompanied by flaking or scaling on other parts of the body, should be treated by a doctor.
      Here are 5 important things you should do to control your dandruff problem.
      1. Use a medicated shampoo. The medicated shampoo will reduce the speed of the growth of the cells on the scalp, thus lessening the cell replacement and decreasing the amount of dandruff. The shampoo should also have an antiseptic that will help prevent infection of your scalp so as to reduce itchiness.
      2. Shampoo more often, up to three times a week using medicated shampoo until the situation is controlled. Then, continue use of the medicated shampoo once every week.
      3. Stop using gels, hairsprays and hair-coloring products. If you must use them, do not use them excessively and learn the proper use of such products.
      4. Don't scratch the scalp when it is itchy. This will cause the problem to worsen.
      5. If the problem is severe, see your doctor for anti-inflammatory cream for your scalp or anti-dandruff tablets to ingest.

  28. QUESTION:
    Hair troubles?
    What's the best treatment for dry hair and dandriff. Do you have any home remedies?

    • ANSWER:
      Dandruff is a common scalp condition characterized by white flakes on the scalp.

      Dandruff is also known as seborrheic dermatitis. With dandruff, there is inflammation of the superficial layers of the skin, causing scales on the scalp and other parts of the body.

      The mild scalp inflammation is caused by the body’s reaction to the Pityrosporum yeast and to products that break down oils.

      Some holistic practitioners believe that dandruff is dependent on the health of the entire body, particularly the digestive system.

      Diet
      Fried foods should be avoided. Reduce intake of fats, dairy products, sugars, chocolate, seafood, and peanuts. Increase green leafy vegetables and raw foods. Eat a whole foods diet.

      Nutritional Supplements and Vitamins
      Biotin – Biotin is a water-soluble B vitamin that helps to break down fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. It is sold in supplement form and is also found naturally in foods. Food sources of biotin include brewer's yeast, nutritional yeast, whole grains, nuts, egg yolks, sardines, liver, cauliflower, bananas, and mushrooms.

      Other nutritional supplements used for dandruff are:

      Vitamin B complex, especially vitamin B1 and B2

      Vitamin A

      Omega fatty acids, especially omega-6

      Zinc

      Topical Remedies
      Grapefruit seed extract – A few drops of grapefruit seed extract can be added to shampoo.

      Tea tree oil – Look for a tea tree oil shampoo or add a few drops of tea tree oil to shampoo.

      Apple cider vinegar – Mix 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar with 1/4 cup water. Pour into spray bottle and spritz onto your hair and scalp (avoiding the eyes) and wrap your head in a towel. Remove after 15 minutes to one hour and wash hair. Once to twice a week. This is a popular home remedy for dandruff.

      Selenium-based shampoo – Selenium acts as an anti-fungal agent.

      Flaxseed oil or vitamin E oil – Apply these oils to the scalp nightly and wash off in the morning. They can soothe and nourish the scalp. Use an old sheet or towel to protect your pillow.

      Symptoms of Dandruff
      Dandruff develops gradually. White or yellow (greasy) flakes appear on the hair and scalp, which may be accompanied by itching and redness. There is no hair loss.

      People with the severe form of this condition may have yellow or red scaling pimples on the hairline, behind the ears, in the ear, or in the creases beside the nose. Factors that worsen dandruff are:

      genetics. Dandruff tends to run in families

      stress, emotional and physical

      climate (worse in the winter)

      Dandruff may preceed or be associated with development of psoriasis. People with neurological disease such as Parkinsons, or HIV may have severe dandruff or other forms of seborrheic dermatitis

  29. QUESTION:
    Seborrheic dermatitis please help?
    I`m 21 and since more than a year i`ve had seborrheic dermatitis in my face...
    i`ve always had dry skin, but now it`s really bad, and plus i have a bad acne!
    but i`m taking pills to take the acne away now!

    What can i do for the seborrheic dermatitis?
    I`ve been to the dermatologist, but he didn`t help me...i don`t know anymore what i should do!
    are there any natural ways, or cremes to take it away?
    or how can i cure it? something that really helps

    please help!!
    thanku =)
    Taiger_Z: Hi thanks for your nice answer. yes, i have rosacea too!
    ma dermatologist looked at me and just told me " no no it`s a normal acne", but im red, i can see that it is rosacea..
    but unfortunately he doesn`t help me a lot..
    i live in europe, so i don`t even know if they have the same cremes and stuff here!
    but thx for your nice answers! :)

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Amelie,
      You'll be pleased to know there are a few things you can do about seborrheic dermatitis (you spelled it properly which is rare to see well done! Im going to abbreviate it to "SD" from now on though) even on the face. Do you have it on the scalp as well? And do you have rosacea as well (one quarter of people with SD have rosacea as well.) Either way, I will include all information about this as treatment for these are slightly different. First of all im going to bore you with a little SD and rosacea 101 in case you aren't fully aware and then ill tell you how to treat it!
      First of all seborrheic dermatitis is an inflammatory condition causing flaking skin and occasionally causes a bright reddening in the areas it affects (rosacea) - which are mostly areas with over-active sebaceous glands (oil-producing) in combination with irritation from a type of yeast. This condition is relatively common and affects about 5% of europeans, and causes the skin to flake off. while its not really an illness or worrying condition to have, it does has cosmetic problems as it can look unpleasant as it shows on prominent features that everyone can see such as eyebrows, eyelids, sides of the nose, around the lips - especially at the corners of the mouth - and middle of the chest. A lot of things can make it worse such as stress, smoking, being over-worked/fatigue and obesity and there is also a genetic factor, so it can also run in families (keep this information in mind so you can help your kids in the future if you wish to have kids and they develop this.)

      To alleviate the dandruff on the scalp caused by SD i advise prescription from the doctor of a shampoo called "ketopine" which should be effective as this is what i was once issued for my dandruff and it did help. There is an active ingredient called ketoconazole which is commonly used for dry-skin conditions. If you do not wish to involve a doctor, look in the supermarket for shampoos containing that chemical or salicylic acid. Selenium is also said to help. Keep in mind "head and shoulders" is supposed to work but i dont think it contains ketoconazole.

      If you haven't already, you should see another doctor as your dermatologist was clearly unhelpful and in case your condition is worse than i think as for severe cases corticosteroids will be prescribed which will help (know that long-term use of corticosteroids can induce rosacea if not already occurred). However topical immune modulators (a type of cream) are what is currently prescribed to massage into areas such as the face around twice a day to reduce the symptoms. Again, if you dont want to involve your doctor, There is a medication called hydrocortisone for which you don not need a prescription for, and is used to treat minor skin conditions including dry skin, flaking and itchiness. It comes in many forms: ointments, creams, lotions, gel, and sprays for use on the skin. There are also things you can buy from shops that can help but im not sure of any brand names, mainly things containing aloe vera gel will help reduce flaking and sooth areas that may itch/sting.

      Healthy eating and sunlight is also said to reduce the symptoms of SE as well as occasional excersize.

      As for rosacea, this is also chronic but can be drastically reduced by therepy such as "intense pulse light", "photodynamic therapy", or medication such as isotretinoin (accutane) - a form of vitamin A These effects can last from months to years without them being noticable, however the condition may come back to which you may want more treatment. Sulfa-based face washes may be a great idea as this also helps with acne, as does accutane.

      Interesting fact (maybe..) Young children especially new born babies get this quite often on their scalp but in these cases it is called 'cradle cap'.

      Just in case you werent already aware, SD is a life-long problem but it can be kept in check rather easily with minimal changes to everyday life (really, just use a special shampoo and some topical face-cream perhaps twice a week once its controlled)

      And finally on a personal note, if it bothers you id advise you; dont really worry about it. Those that matter to you will see right through it. In the winter i tend to get it around the corners of my mouth and forehead that no amount of moisturising will alleviate, but that never stopped my special someone from telling me i was "beautiful". Though i would have prefered handsome... ha

      Anyway, i hope i have entailed sufficient information for you and you satisfied with its accuracy. If you would like further information on anything, im currently studying this and similar conditions for my medical course so feel free to email me and ill reply when i see it :)

      Take care and best wishes,
      Z.H.T.V

  30. QUESTION:
    Teenage Acne or Allergic Reaction?
    i just started getting these breakouts all over my face, as well as my chest/back. these areas are really really dry, and covered in red bumps. and it itches SO much! is it just acne from being a teenager, or is it an allergic reaction?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like a reaction to me. Do you spend a lot of time in the sun? Do you sweat a lot in these areas? You can get contact dermatitis from the sun...it's when sweat irritates your skin and causes a rash. I'm guessing dry skin would be even more difficult.

      Did the rash just start today? It could also be an allergic reaction to detergent. Did you recently switch?

      Whenever I get a rash I take Benedryl and (if I can) an oatmeal bath to stop the itching!!

      Here are some different things I've found:

      What are the symptoms of heat rash?

      Heat rash looks like dots or tiny pimples. In young children, heat rash can appear on the head, neck, and shoulders. The rash areas can get irritated by clothing or scratching, and, rarely, a secondary skin infection may develop.

      "What Are the Symptoms of Eczema?

      The appearance of eczema can vary from person to person. In adults, eczema occurs most frequently on the hands and elbows, and in "bending" areas such as the inside of the elbows and back of the knees. In young children, eczema is often seen on the elbows, knees, face, neck, and scalp. Symptoms of eczema include:

      * Itchiness
      * Skin redness
      * Dry, scaly, or crusted skin that might become thick and leathery from long-term scratching
      * Formation of small, fluid-filled blisters that might ooze when scratched
      * Infection of the areas where the skin has been broken

      What Are the Symptoms of Granuloma Annulare?

      People who have granuloma annulare usually notice a ring of small, firm bumps over the backs of the forearms, hands or feet. More than one ring may be noticed in some cases. The rash may be mildly itchy.
      How Is Granuloma Annulare Diagnosed?

      The condition is diagnosed by a doctor who may use a skin biopsy to confirm the diagnosis.

      How Is Granuloma Annulare Treated?

      Treatment often is not necessary, except for cosmetic reasons. In some cases, creams or ointments are used to help the bumps disappear. Some doctors may decide to freeze the lesions with liquid nitrogen or to inject steroids directly into the rings of bumps. Ultraviolet light therapy or oral medications can be used in severe cases.

      How Do I know if I Have Dermatitis?

      Dry skin is defined as flaking or scaling -- which may or may not be itchy -- when there is no evidence of dermatitis, or inflammation, of the skin. Some flaking along with redness, however, may be a sign of an underlying dermatitis. There are different types of dermatitis that may cause dry, itchy, flaking skin.

      They include:

      * Seborrheic dermatitis. This type involves a red, scaly, itchy rash on various areas of the body, particularly those areas that contain many oil glands. Seborrheic dermatitis can occur as scaling on the scalp, eyebrows and sides of the nose.
      * Allergic contact dermatitis. This occurs when the skin comes into contact with a substance that causes an immune reaction, such as poison ivy. Allergic contact dermatitis of the hands often causes scaling on the fingers.

  31. QUESTION:
    small red bumps of face and head of a month old baby?
    hi
    my baby girl when she was 3 weeks old started having some red bumps on her cheeks. then they developed into red rashes.. i was using all johnson and johnson products and someone advised me to try avino instead and it kind of got better.. but, then she started having red bumps on the back of her head and neck and it looks really bad.. please advise..

    • ANSWER:
      It's often difficult to diagnose a rash without looking at it, but from your description I have a sense of what may be going on.

      There are three common rashes that babies can have in the first few months of life. Baby acne is very common and usually starts by about 3 weeks of age. In baby acne, you see red bumps that look like pimples. The bumps are on the cheeks, forehead, and temples. They do not cause any discomfort to the baby, though it often can look very distressing to parents. No treatment is needed for infant acne. It occurs because of the hormonal changes that are occurring in the baby after birth, and will go away on its own in several weeks. You don't need to put any special creams or lotions on it, and you definitely want to avoid any acne products made for teenagers and adults.

      Another common rash at this age is seborrhea, also known as seborrheic dermatitis. It usually starts by one month of age. When you begin to notice red bumps (usually smaller than the pimples of acne) and yellow crusty scales and flakes on the hair-bearing areas of the body, such as the eyebrows, eyelashes, and scalp. It also tends to affect the neck and shoulder. Its cause is not entirely clear, though it may be related to eczema. This is what it sounds like your baby has, given the yellow crusts that you describe on the eyebrows. It is not caused by allergy to what she is eating, and the breastfeeding is not contributing to it. While it will go away by itself eventually, it can be treated with certain types of steroid-based creams, if necessary.

      Infant eczema is also very common. It usually starts between 1 and 5 months of age. In eczema, you have red bumps and patches in various locations. Eczema often affects both cheeks, on the face only, but it can be much more diffuse, and some babies will have the rash all over as they get older. While it's true that some babies with bad eczema have allergies such as to milk, in the majority of infants a specific cause cannot be found, other than a tendency to have dry skin. Some infants who have eczema outgrow it as they get older, while others continue to have problems with it throughout childhood. Eczema is treated with moisturizing agents, and if it's severe, may also need to be treated with steroid creams or other prescription ointments.

      Mention the rash to your baby's doctor at her next visit. If it doesn't seem to be disappearing on its own, or it seems to worsen, I reccomend that you have the rash checked.

  32. QUESTION:
    how to get rid of dandruff naturally?

    • ANSWER:
      Dandruff
      Definition

      Dandruff is the common name for a mild form of seborrheic dermatitis of unknown cause. It is a natural and harmless scalp condition in which the shedding of dead skin cells occurs at an unusually fast rate. Because of the oily skin often associated with this condition, these cells clump together and flake off as dandruff.

      Description

      Dandruff is very common. Up to one-third of the U.S. population is affected by this condition. While it is not considered a disease, dandruff is a cosmetic concern for many people.

      The following problems tend to exacerbate dandruff:

      cold weather
      dry indoor heating
      stress (physical or emotional)
      food allergies
      nutritional deficiencies (B-complex vitamins or omega-3 fatty acids)
      use of hair spray and gels
      use of hair-coloring chemicals
      use of electric hair curlers or blow dryers
      Causes & Symptoms

      Dandruff is caused by an overgrowth of skin cells that make up the scalp. It is not known what accelerates this cell growth. However, scientists have suggested that dandruff may be a hypersensitive reaction to the proliferation of Pityrosporum ovale, a yeast that occurs naturally on the scalp. Another theory that held for some time linked dandruff to a fungus. A 2002 report said that scientists had identified new fungi of the Malassezia that seem to exist in overabundance on the scalps of those affected with the disease.

      Diagnosis

      Dandruff is easy to diagnose. The condition is characterized by the appearance of white flakes on the hair or on the shoulders and collar. People with oily hair tend to have dandruff more often. Dandruff usually does not require medical treatment. However, if, in addition to dandruff, a person also has greasy scaling on the face, eyebrows and eyelashes and thick, red patches on the body, he or she may have the more severe form of seborrheic dermatitis. This condition may require medical advice and treatment.

      Treatment

      Alternative treatments for dandruff include nutritional therapy, herbal therapy and relaxation therapy.

      Nutritional Therapy

      The following nutritional changes may be helpful:

      Identification and avoidance of potential allergenic foods.
      Limited intake of milk and other dairy products, seafoods and fatty treats. These foods tend to exacerbate dandruff.
      Reduction or elimination of animal proteins and eating mostly whole grains, fresh vegetables, beans and fruit.
      Avoiding citrus until dandruff clears.
      Diet supplemented with B-complex vitamins which may alleviate dandruff condition.
      Avoiding excess salt, sugar, and alcohol.
      Taking 1 tablespoon of flaxseed oil per day. Flaxseed oil is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may be effective in treating a variety of skin conditions including dandruff.
      From a traditional medical approach, dandruff may be the body's way of eliminating excess protein accumulated but not assimilated in the system. It may also be a symptom of liver and kidney imbalances. A more stabilizing diet is needed, reducing highly acidic foods such as tomatoes and certain spices.

      Herbal Therapy

      Massaging tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) into the scalp may help prevent or relieve dandruff. This oil can relieve scaling and itching. Ayurvedic treatment also includes various oil therapies, called suehana for the head. Increased exercise can increase circulation and help eliminate fats and oils.

      Relaxation Therapies

      Relaxation techniques such as meditation or yoga may help relieve stress, which exacerbates dandruff.

      Allopathic Treatment

      There is no cure for this natural harmless skin condition. Because a greasy scalp is associated with dandruff condition, more frequent hair washing using regular shampoo is usually all that is needed. In more severe cases, medicated shampoo may be necessary.

      The two most commonly used anti-dandruff shampoos are selenium sulfide and zinc pyrithione. Both of these are cytostatic agents. Cytostatic drugs slow down the growth and formation of top skin layer on the scalp. To get the best result, one should leave the shampoo on for as long as possible. It is recommended that a person lather the anti-dandruff shampoo at the beginning of the shower, leave it on until the end of the shower, then rinse, lather, and rinse again. As a result of treatment with any of these drugs, dandruff will become less noticeable. Because it can be irritating, shampoo containing selenium sulfide should not be used if the skin is cut or abraded.

      Products containing salicylic acid and sulfur are reserved for more severe cases. Salicylic acid loosens the dead skin cells so that they can be sloughed off more easily. Sometimes, antibacterial shampoos are used to reduce bacteria on the scalp.

      Recently, antifungal products, such as ketoconazole (Nizoral) shampoos, are available over-the-counter (1% preparation) and by prescription (2% preparation). These shampoos are often prescribed by dermatologists to reduce the growth of P. ovale. These preparations may be helpful if dandruff is not relieved by other shampoo treatments.

      The most severe and recalcitrant dandruff conditions may require tar shampoos. These shampoos reduce the growth of top skin cells on the scalp. It is recommended that the shampoo be left on the hair for at least 10 minutes for best results. Coal tar shampoos can be messy and can stain blond or white hair. Coal tar also can be carcinogenic (causing cancer). However, the FDA approves this product because when used as shampoo, because it contacts the scalp for only a short period of time. Still, it is a good idea to use alternative treatments for this relatively harmless condition.

      Because anti-dandruff shampoos may lose effectiveness after a while, it may be helpful to rotate between a medicated shampoo and a regular shampoo or try a different type of anti-dandruff shampoo.

      Expected Results

      While one can not cure dandruff, it can be easily managed. A mild dandruff condition often responds to more frequent hair washes with regular shampoo. More severe conditions may require anti-dandruff preparations.

      Prevention

      Preventive measures include regular hair washing, reducing stress, eating healthy foods and increasing humidity inside the house. In addition, excessive use of hair curlers, hair sprays and gels, and frequent hair coloring should be avoided. These tend to irritate the scalp and may worsen dandruff.

      http://www.tipsandtreats.com/dandruff-tips.asp

      http://www.hairparlor.com/haircare-articles/natural-dandruff-remedies.htm

      http://www.indiaparenting.com/beauty/article.cgi?art_id=78&sec_id=1

      http://sawaal.ibibo.com/stress/how-get-rid-dandruff-whts-cause-severe-hairfall-325139.html

      All the best :)

  33. QUESTION:
    Itchy skin and scalp?
    Ive been having a issue lately. When stressed, sweating, or embarrassed. My main areas (Legs, and Scalp) become extremely itchy. There is no bumps or sign of a rash, although after itching the area becomes red and hot. Im a 15yr old male that lives in Mississippi.

    • ANSWER:
      •Scalp Itching Causes: Contact Dermatitis

      Contact dermatitis can arise when a new hair product is used that the scalp is sensitive to. Itching is a prominent symptom, but a rash and skin flaking may also be present. With these symptoms, it's important to reassess all hair products, particularly new products that have recently been used. Reactions to hair dyes and perm solutions can also be a cause. Usually, discontinuing the product will solve the problem, but for some people the itching may be so severe that a steroid cream may be needed.

      •2
      Scalp Itching Causes: Head Lice

      This isn't the most common cause of an itchy scalp, but head lice can cause a great deal of scalp irritation. Although itching is one of the most common symptoms, particularly around the ears and neck, a small number of people with head lice have relatively few symptoms. Most people think of this as being a disease of children, but it can affect all ages. Head lice are most easily detected by dampening the hair and combing it with a fine toothed nit comb available at most drugstores. After combing each section, the comb is carefully checked for the presence of lice eggs, also known as nits. To treat this condition, the nits need to be removed by repeated combing followed by treatment with a special shampoo formulated to treat lice. The combing and shampooing sequence may need to be repeated several times until the comb comes back nit free several times in a row.

      •3
      Scalp Itching Causes: Seborrheic Dermatitis

      This is a scalp condition characterized by chronic inflammation that leads to itching, flaking, and, in more severe cases, areas of patchy hair loss. This condition, more commonly known as dandruff, is more commonly seen in men, particularly younger males, although both sexes can be affected. The cause is still not completely understood. Genetic influences and hormonal factors may be important, although sensitivity to a yeast called Malassezia is also a proposed cause. Treatment consists of medicated shampoos found at most local drugstores, although prescription strength shampoos may be needed in severe cases.

      •4
      Scalp Itching Causes: Psoriasis

      This is a skin condition that can also affect the scalp causing itching, flaking, and the formation of thick plaques. It can be difficult to distinguish from seborrheic dermatitis, although a personal or family history of psoriasis usually clinches the diagnosis. This is one cause of scalp itching that needs professional treatment. Medicated shampoos containing coal tar may be useful in mild cases, but prescriptions will probably be needed for more severe outbreaks. Sunlight has shown promise in the treatment of psoriasis of the scalp. Ultraviolet light combs are now available to treat psoriasis without the need to go outside.

      •5
      The bottom line? If you're unsure what's causing scalp itching, it's always wise to get a medical consultation. More serious causes such as psoriasis of the scalp is likely to be a chronic condition and should be evaluated by a dermatologist.
      Remedies
      2.The mayoclinic.com website, in its article "Dandruff Alternative Medicine," states that tea tree oil, which comes from the leaves of the Australian tea tree, is effective in treating dry, itchy scalp. It is well known for its antibiotic, anti-fungal and antiseptic properties. You can purchase tea tree oil at a health food store, or already in a commercially prepared shampoo. Just add 1/2 drop of tea tree oil for every ounce of shampoo in your bottle. For instance, an 8-ounce bottle would need four drops of tea tree oil. Shake well before using. You can gradually increase up to one drop per ounce if the dilution is not effective after a couple of weeks.
      The homeremedies.ygoy.com website has a few home remedies to try such as applying aloe Vera gel to your scalp and leaving it for approximately 20 minutes. Shampoo your hair as normal.
      Using olive, coconut or almond oil on your scalp is good for your hair and can have an anti-fungal effect. Apply the oil to your scalp, wrap with a towel and leave on for at least 30 minutes, or overnight. You may have to shampoo twice to get rid of all the oil.
      Lemon juice has a soothing effect on a dry, itchy scalp and is a natural conditioner. Massage into your scalp and leave on for a few minutes. Shampoo and style as usual.
      Mixing one part apple cider vinegar with four parts water can relieve scalp itching. Apply to the scalp, massage in, and then shampoo as usual.
      Baking soda can reduce itching by exfoliating the scalp area. Make a paste with baking soda and water, apply to your scalp and massage in. Rinse your hair thoroughly with only water after using the baking soda.

  34. QUESTION:
    Burning in mustache area and around nose!?
    I first noticed the central areas of my face had a great deal of very tiny bumps (pin head sized) so I exfoliated them away gently and never had a problem until about 3 weeks later when I experienced a mild burning on my upper lip in the mustache area.

    one day I noticed my mustache area looked very red, almost like a second mustache under my nose and extending out (the burning sensation was pretty severe at the time as well) when I was in cleveland [very humid]

    I eventually forgot about it, but when the burning and redness returned it started to burn to wash my face, and my cheeks felt really dry, but still looked oily!

    I went to the derm and was diagnosed with perioral dermatitis, but the treatment was completely ineffective... I'm now being told it may have ben seborrheic dermatitis all along...

    anyone with seb derb do you experience burning around your mouth, nose and a little on the cheeks? I also experience itching in the same places.. is this normal? can it be helped?
    Ambrella, no I do not use drugs... I don't eat any fast food, try to drink a ton of water and otherwise am very healthy.

    • ANSWER:
      hi, i'm going through the exact same thing right now and it sucks!... i was gonna e-mail you but you don't allow e-mails... have you found a solution? i went to the dermatologist and she told me i have perioral dermatitis... but now i'm beginning to think i have seborrheic because my scalp is really itchy and my eyes, ears too... she sent me some corticosteroid cream but then i read on the internet that cream only makes it worse... and it hasn't even helped... maybe we can figure out what is causing us this. e-mail me, maybe there's something were both doing that's causing this.

  35. QUESTION:
    how to remove dandruff?
    My wife is suffering a lot from too much dandruff. She used all most all the anti-dandruff shampoos. Please give any good solution to this problem.

    • ANSWER:
      Dandruff is of two types:
      •Waxy dandruff – it occurs the epidermis scales which is mixed with the sebum that stick to the scalp in the form of patches.
      •Dry dandruff – in this, small white flakes of scalp falls or may get attached to the skin of head.

      TREATMENT
      ~ The appearance of flakes can be reduced, especially in those who suffer from only a mild case of dandruff, by proper hair care. Some people mistakenly avoid washing their hair, believing that the drying effect of shampoo will worsen their dandruff. By washing the hair regularly, however, dead skin is in fact removed before it can build up into larger, more noticeable flakes.
      ~ Using acid-based shampoos helps restore acidity to the scalp, breaking down oils and preventing dead skin cells from collecting into visible clumps. However, shampoos with milder medication, or shampoos that are not marked to treat seborrheic dermatitis, may have little to no effect on redness and irritation.

      ~ There are shampoo brands available specifically for those who have dandruff. The gold standard of treatment is a tar shampoo that contains salicylic acid.

      ~Other less effective products are Head & Shoulders, which contains zinc pyrithione, Selsun Blue which contains selenium sulfide, Neutrogena, T/Gel, which contains coal tar; and various generic products with the same active ingredients.

      ~ Severe forms of dandruff, particularly if accompanied by flaking or scaling on other parts of the body, should be treated by a dermatologist. Dandruff can occur in conjuction with skin conditions such as seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis.

      ~ Dandruff varies from person to person. It may be necessary to try various shampoos with different active ingredients (selenium sulfide, tar, salicylic acid, zinc pyrithione, ketoconazole) to find the best suited for any one individual.

      ~ Furthermore, tea tree oil's antifungal activity has been found useful in the treatment of dandruff.

      Home Remedies

      •Hot stream bath especially on the scalp is highly beneficial.

      •Massage of warm olive or sesame oil and then wrap a warm cloth or a towel on head for few minutes is very helpful in getting rid of dandruff.

      •For getting rid of dandruff apply peel of lime immersed in coconut milk or oil heated naturally by leaving it in sunshine for ten days.

      •Apply hot olive oil or sesame oil on the scalp at bed time. Now an hour prior to the bathing rub lime juice mixed with the cosmetic vinegar on the scalp. Wash and rinse your hairs properly. For the last rinse use lime juice and warm water. Follow this process for about 3 months twice a week. This will surely help in relieving from dandruff.

      •Massage the scalp with almond and olive oil for five minutes, leave it for some time and then rinse off to get the dandruff free hairs.

      •Final rinsing of hairs with the cider vinegar after applying a herbal shampoo also relieves from dandruff.

      •Applying two table spoon of cosmetic vinegar and six table spoon of hot water on the scalp with the help of cotton swab and leave it over night. After that wash it with herbal or a mild baby shampoo.

      •Giving sufficient exposure of sun to the scalp is another important method of getting rid of dandruff.

      •Applying gently warm coconut oil mixed with one hundredth of black pepper is very good remedy for treating dandruff.

      •Beet root crushed in henna paste is good in preventing dandruff and hair fall when applied on head.

      •Beet root juice mixed with cider vinegar and ginger juice is very helpful in treating dandruff.

      •Juice of snake gourd is very effective treatment in curing dandruff when rubbed gently on the scalp.

      •Fenugreek seeds are soaked in water and let undisturbed overnight. Now these seeds are grinded and applied on scalp gently. Leave it for 45 minutes. Then rinse off with the help of shikakai or ritha.

      •Massaging hairs with curd mixed with lime juice and amla (Indian goose berry) before going to bed is a good method of relieving from situations of hair fall and dandruff.

      •Washing hairs with powder of green gram is also good to prevent dandruff.

      •Last rinse with the lime juice is beneficial for hair fall an dandruff condition.
      •Avoid using red meat, sweets, strong coffees and teas, candies, aerated drinks like Pepsi and coke, pickles and spices.

      •One should be very particular about the diet and should stress on food stuff like fresh fruits, vegetables, sprouted seeds, raw nuts and cereals.

      •Massaging of pure apple juice and thrice the quantity of warm water is good treatment of fading away dandruff.

      ~ For dandruff , the recommended treatment of choice is shampoo of KETOCONAZOLE,an antifungal agent marked in india with the commercial names i.e. shampoo NIZORAL / NIZRAL by a good brand. It should be applied thrice a week untill dandruff disappears. Dandruff will disapear like magic without any side effect.After dandruff is over, use DOVE shampoo and continue i

  36. QUESTION:
    does anyone else have roseacea and how do you cope with it?

    • ANSWER:
      Rosacea is a common but often misunderstood condition that is estimated to affect over 45 million people worldwide. It affects fair-skinned people of mostly north-western European descent, and has been nicknamed the 'curse of the Celts' by some in Ireland. It begins as erythema (flushing and redness) on the central face and across the cheeks, nose, or forehead but can also less commonly affect the neck and chest. As rosacea progresses, other symptoms can develop such as semi-permanent erythema, telangiectasia (dilation of superficial blood vessels on the face), red domed papules (small bumps) and pustules, red gritty eyes, burning and stinging sensations, and in some advanced cases, a red lobulated nose (rhinophyma). The disorder can be confused and co-exist with acne vulgaris and/or seborrheic dermatitis. Rosacea affects both sexes, but is almost three times more common in women, and has a peak age of onset between 30 and 60. The presence of rash on the scalp or ears suggests a different or co-exisitng diagnosis, as rosacea is primarily a facial diagnosis.

      Treating rosacea varies from patient to patient depending on severity and subtypes. Dermatologists are recommended to take a subtype-directed approach to treating rosacea patients.

      Trigger avoidance can help reduce the onset of rosacea but alone will not normally cause remission for all but mild cases. The National Rosacea Society recommends that a diary be kept to help identify and reduce triggers.

      It is important to have a gentle skin cleansing regimen using non-irritating cleansers. Protection from the sun is important and daily use of a sunscreen of at least SPF 15 containing a physical blocker such as zinc oxide or titanium dioxide is advised.

      Oral tetracycline antibiotics (tetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline) and topical antibiotics such as metronidazole are usually the first line of defence prescribed by doctors to relieve papules, pustules, inflammation and some redness. Oral antibiotics may also help to relieve symptoms of ocular rosacea. If papules and pustules persist, then sometimes isotretinoin can be prescribed. Isotretinoin has many side effects and is normally used to treat severe acne but in low dosages is proven to be effective against papulopustular and phymatous rosacea.

      The treatment of flushing and blushing has been attempted by means of the centrally-acting α-2 agonist clonidine, but there is no evidence whatsoever that this is of any benefit. The same is true of the beta-blockers nadolol and propanolol. If flushing occurs with red wine consumption, then complete avoidance helps. There is no evidence at all that antihistamines are of any benefit in rosacea.

      People who develop infections of the eyelids must practice frequent eyelid hygiene. Daily scrubbing the eyelids gently with diluted baby shampoo or an over-the-counter eyelid cleaner and applying warm (but not hot) compresses several times a day is recommended.

      Dermatological vascular laser (single wavelength) or Intense Pulsed Light (broad spectrum) machines offer one of the best treatments for rosacea, in particular the erythema (redness) of the skin. They use light to penetrate the epidermis to target the capillaries in the dermis layer of the skin. The light is absorbed by oxy-hemoglobin which heat up causing the capillary walls to heat up to 70ºC, damaging them, causing them to be absorbed by the body's natural defense mechanism.

      CO2 lasers can be used to remove excess tissue caused by phymatous rosacea. CO2 lasers emit a wavelength that is absorbed directly by the skin. The laser beam can be focused into a thin beam and used as a scalpel or defocused and used to vaporise tissue.

  37. QUESTION:
    why do babies get cradle cap?

    • ANSWER:
      Cradle Cap (Infantile seborrhoeic dermatitis, or also known as crusta lactea, milk crust, honeycomb disease(English); // Or in a few other languages (By Andi_VL) croûte de lait,eczéma infantile, dermatite atopique infantile (French); //- ne shqip njihet si - rrjebull ose rrjebulla (Albanian);// crosta lattea (Italian);// and σμηγματόρροια του τριχωτού της κεφαλής των νεογνών (Greek)(you can spell it better in this way - smigmatoria tu trikotu tis chefalis ton neognon)). Cradle Cap is a patchy, greasy, scaly and crusty skin rash that occurs on the scalp of recently born babies. Cradle cap can occur in any baby, and most commonly begins sometime in the first 3 months. The same rash is often prominent around the ear or the eyebrows. It may appear in other locations as well, where it is called seborrheic dermatitis rather than cradle cap.

      Contents [hide]
      1 Causes
      2 Treatment
      3 References
      4 External links

      [edit]
      Causes
      The cause of cradle cap is not clearly defined but it is not caused by an infection, allergy nor from poor hygiene. Possibly it has to do with overactive sebaceous glands in the skin of newborn babies, due to the mother's hormones still in the baby's circulation. The glands release a greasy substance that makes old skin cells attach to the scalp as they try to dry and fall off. There may be a relationship with skin yeasts (malassezia).

      [edit]
      Treatment
      A small amount of oil will soften the scales. Olive oil is often recommended, but some doctors discourage this, as it may lead to yeast infections. Mineral oil or baby oil can also be used. After several minutes / hours they can be brushed away with a soft brush or cloth. In her book, Dr. Miriam Stoppard also advises washing the baby's hair regularly with a mild baby shampoo. In severe cases some doctors recommend use of dandruff shampoo. Be careful when using dandruff shampoo, as it may irritate the eyes more than baby shampoo.[1]

  38. QUESTION:
    Dandruff related problem. Please help!?
    My scalps are full of dandruff. I was advised to use 'Head & Shoulder' shampoo. And i did so. But one week passed. I shampoo my hair everyday, but there is no improvement noticed instead my hairs started falling.

    Plese tell me what should i do.

    • ANSWER:
      for immediate remedy you can use selsun shampoo, available in medical stores.
      But Seborrhoea is a disorder of the sebaceous glands which affects the scalp. Seborrhoea produces severe dandruff and a red, itchy scalp. Dandruff rarely causes hair loss or baldness. However, severe seborrheic dermatitis may cause patchy baldness.

      Avoid intake of excessive oily and sweet foods.
      Do not use Hard shampoos.
      Keep your scalp and hair clean.
      if you are using an anti dandruff shampoo, make sure you wash your comb every time after using the shampoo.
      Do not allow your hair to remain wet for a long time. Leaving the scalp wet for a long time facilitates growth of dandruff.

      Massage scalp with a mixture made of equal quantities of lime juice and vinegar. Wash hair with egg shampoo after this.Egg shampoo can be prepared by beating 2 or 3 eggs with a little water in it. Apply this mixture on the hair after wetting the hair and massage the scalp for sometime. Let this remain on the hair for sometime before washing it off with water. This treatment is very effective in preventing dandruff.

      Fenugreek is very effective in preventing dandruff, hair fall and baldness. Soak fenugreek seeds in water overnight and grind it into a fine paste the following morning. Leave this paste applied on the scalp for 30 to 45 minutes and then wash it with a mild shampoo.

      Tea tree oil is found to be an effective medicine against dandruff. Into some hot water, mix 1 teaspoon tea tree oil and massage your scalp with this. Wash your hair with lemon water followed by pure water. After washing, wrap a hot moist towel around your head for some time. The best time to do this is at night before going to bed.

  39. QUESTION:
    Good remedies for seborrheic dermatitis?
    I've had this condition for as long as I have known, it usually comes and goes but when it does affect me, it is quite severe and affects me for quite a while.

    Recently, I've had another relapse. Quite frankly, I'm sick of my scalp being intensely itchy 24/7 and seeing large yellow/white flakes of dead skin falling onto my clothes. It's unsightly and embarrassing, especially when I'm at school. I see a dermatologist regularly, and all he has suggested so far is a tar shampoo, which has had no effect. This condition is affecting me worse than ever, my education has suffered because I am unable to concentrate on work whilst itching furiously and my self esteem has plummeted, I feel so disgusting. Can people suggest any type of treatment for this?

    Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, you can try one of the natural treatments available on the Internet. Some of them do actually work. For my seb. dermatitis on scalp I use psoriasis herbal cream by Champori quite successfully. It takes just a couple of weeks to clear the spots and they then stay clear for months on end.
      Try it: Champori is available online without prescription and comes with money back guarantee so if it doesn't work for you - it's free.
      Best,
      Gussie

  40. QUESTION:
    Please help me with Seborrheic Eczema!?
    Im 18 and Ive suffered with Seborrheic Eczema for at least 5 years. Ive been to the doctor and have been prescirbed many different treatments over the years.
    I suffer from it on my eye lids, in my ears, my scalp, and to my severe embarassment, on my face...
    I was prescribed Nizoral shampoo from the Dr, and that instantly cleared up the scalp, where I used to suffer from it badly.
    My face is the area that causes me the worst discomfort. It doesnt itch at all. It only feels tight after washing. If it wasnt for the redness you wouldnt be able to tell its there. I have the redness over my nose and my cheeks, in a big patch. It doesnt hurt at all.
    Im too embarassed by it to live my life. I quit college because of it, as I always feel people are looking at my face because of the redness. I dont dare go for good jobs or socialise because of my face. Ive cut my self off from all of my friends. I even struggle with just walking through town or going shopping.
    I permanantly feel embarrased by it and its caused me to have little confidence.
    Ive used Oxytetracycline tablets, creams, steroid creams and Ive also recently tried Nizoral cream because it contains ketaconazole because of that being an ingredient in the Nizoral shampoo that worked so well, but NOTHING helps to reduce the redness on my face. Every time time that I go to the Dr’s they just seem to be stuck and not know what to do next.
    Is there anyone that knows of anything that may be able to help me?
    Has anyone got any similar success storys?
    Does Rosacea affect the scalp?

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrheic dermatitis usually yields to topical hydrocortisone cream ( 1% over the counter and up to 2% by prescription ). It's not like steroids that are injected and continued use doesn't produce the infamous results.

      Based on the redness reported, you might actually have rosacea ( Bill Clinton has this ) and Metrogel (1%) is often prescribed for this.

      Despite the professionalism of dermatologists, they sometimes seems to work in the realm of magic with some things working for some patients and not others and no great predictability as to which is which. Experimentation under MD care is often the way to go.

  41. QUESTION:
    WHAT ARE THESE?!? Red, itchy bumps all over body.?
    I just suddenly got these all over my body. I need them gone! I have over 80 Raised, Red, itchy, itchy, bumps. They are everywhere in clumps and it's gross. Legs, arms and stomach, everywhere. My mom thinks they are bug bites but there are so many over a period of one day. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      This is a common rash. Prickly heat (also called miliaria rubra) is thought to be caused by a combination of heat and blocked sweat ducts. This rash looks like small, red, dome-shaped bumps. It usually appears in places on your body where sweat pools, including the waist, upper body, armpits, the insides of the elbows, and the back of the neck. The bumps are harmless, but they itch and may burn.

      How to Prevent It
      You can avoid getting prickly heat by wearing breathable fabrics like cotton when you're outside in the heat or working out. It's a good idea to avoid getting too hot, and to drink lots of water to keep your body temperature low. In the warmer months, give your body time to adjust to the heat.

      How to Treat It
      Prickly heat will go away on its own if you stay out of the heat. Applying calamine lotion or dusting powder may help ease the burning or itching. If it's really bothering you, you can ask your health professional to give you a prescription for a lotion or cream medicated with a corticosteroid. This cream reduces inflammation and will help the rash go away faster. back to top

      Allergy Rash
      You can get a rash from an allergic reaction that is caused by a particular substance touching your skin. This kind of rash is also called contact dermatitis. The result is a red, hive-like rash that appears anywhere from 12 to 72 hours after you come in contact with whatever is causing your allergy. Without treatment, these rashes can last 11 to 14 days. Most of the time, you get this kind of rash because you're allergic to ingredients in soaps, hair dyes, or lotions. Many people also are allergic to nickel, a metal used in some jewelry. The rash you get after touching poison ivy or oak is also a form of contact dermatitis.

      How to Treat It
      The first step is to figure out what's causing the reaction. The second step is to avoid it. If you have trouble pinpointing exactly what caused the reaction, a dermatologist can do a patch test. In this test, common substances known to cause allergic reactions are applied to small areas (or patches) on your skin to see which ones you react to. To soothe the rash, apply calamine lotion, or a product such as Aveeno® that contains oatmeal. You can also try a topical medication called Caladryl®, but it could cause an allergic reaction. Oral antihistamines such as Benadryl® that you can buy at the drugstore may also be helpful. In severe cases, a dermatologist can prescribe a cream called a topical steroid that will reduce the redness and itching. Ask your health professional or dermatologist which kind of medication is right for the rash you have. back to top

      Poison Ivy/Poison Oak Alert!
      If you know you've been in contact with poison ivy or poison oak, immediately wash the area with soap and water. The idea is to wash off the oil from the plant, which is what causes the reaction. If the rash is already starting, use calamine lotion to help soothe the itching and reduce blistering. Oral antihistamines that you can buy at a drugstore, such as Benadryl, may also help to reduce the itching. If your rash covers a large area and you have any blistering and swelling, see your health professional. He or she will give you a prescription for a stronger topical medication to ease the symptoms.

      Flaky, Itchy Rash
      A red, scaly rash, called seborrheic dermatitis, is pretty common. It usually occurs on the sides of the nose, the eyebrows, the scalp, and behind the ears. In some cases, it occurs in the ears or on the chest. In severe cases, yellowish or reddish pimples can appear on the hairline, behind the ears, and in the ears.

      Seborrheic dermatitis runs in families, and it tends to be worse in the winter. No one knows exactly what causes it. Some experts think that it's caused by certain kinds of bacteria or yeast that normally live on our skin.

      How to Prevent It
      Seborrheic dermatitis is a condition that can occur off and on throughout your life. Since doctors don't know exactly what causes it, it's hard to know if there's anything you can do to prevent it.

      How to Treat It
      Many of the same treatments used to treat dandruff are useful in treating this rash including tar-based shampoos and shampoos containing selenium sulfide and zinc pyrithione. If the rash is on your face, your health professional can prescribe a medicine that reduces inflammation called a corticosteroid to reduce the redness and scaling. Your health professional may also prescribe an anti-fungal cream called ketoconazole, which also works well on this rash. back to top

  42. QUESTION:
    Treatment for Seborrhea - Seborrheic Dermatitis?

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrheic Dermatitis is a very common inflammatory condition of the skin. Seborrheic dermatitis is a disease that causes flaking of the skin. It is a skin condition characterized by loose, greasy or dry, white to yellowish scales, with or without associated reddened skin. It usually affects the scalp. In teenagers and adults, it is commonly known as dandruff. Cradle Cap is the term used when seborrheic dermatitis affects the scalp of infants, it is usually self-limiting and subsides by the age of six months.

      Seborrhea can affect the skin on other parts of the body, such as the face and chest, and the creases of the arms, legs, and groin. Seborrheic dermatitis usually causes the skin to look a little greasy, and scaly or flaky.

      How is Seborrheic Dermatitis Caused?
      The cause of seborrheic dermatitis is not known to anyone very precisely till yet. The causes may be different for babies and for adults. Seborrheic dermatitis may be related to hormones, because the problem often starts in infancy and goes away before puberty. The most popular theory is that it is caused by a sensitivity to yeast called Pityrosporum ovale on the skin, but it has not been proved yet. It is believed that the build-up of yeast in these glands irritates the skin causing redness and flaking. This organism is normally present on the skin in small numbers, but sometimes its numbers increase, resulting in skin problems.

      What are the signs and symptoms of Seborrheic Dermatitis?
      Seborrheic Dermatitis is a common, chronic inflammatory skin disorder that affects the scalp. It is a condition that mainly occurs in the areas where the oil glands are located i.e. mainly in the middle of the face, behind the ears, and especially on the scalp. However, seborrheic dermatitis may also be found on the eyebrows, eyelids, forehead, ears, chest, armpits, groin, area between the shoulder blades, the part of the face where the beard grows and the skin folds beneath the breasts or between the buttocks. It affects approximately 3% to 5% of the population, most commonly men, and peaks in infancy and middle age.

      A dry, flaky scalp is typical in mild cases of seborrheic dermatitis. Severe cases of seborrhea have itching, burning, greasy scales overlying red patches on the scalp. Sometimes the eyes burn or become red. These symptoms may indicate conjunctivitis. The condition is characterized by waxy scale and reddened skin areas. Scales sometimes accumulate at the base of the eyelashes, plugging the follicles and causing them to become red, painful, or swollen (a disorder called seborrheic blepharitis).

      Seborrheic Dermatitis Treatment and Cure
      Avoidance of tinctures (alcoholic solutions), hair tonics, greasy ointments or soap
      Ketoconazole cream may be applied topically once or twice daily
      Low potency glucocorticoid creams may be applied topically once or twice daily
      Ketoconazole po 200 mg QD for 7 to 14 days
      Treatments for seborrheic dermatitis are usually applied directly to the skin in the form of shampoo or lotion. The treatment option you choose for treating seborrheic dermatitis will entirely depend on the patient's age and the location of the body it affects. Treatment can last for several weeks or months and in some severe cases may need to be repeated if the condition occurs again.

      Some of the effective treatments of seborrheic dermatitis are discussed below:

      A very common and effective treatment for seborrheic dermatitis is to treat the scalp with a shampoo that contains sulfur, zinc pyrithione (like head and shoulders), salicylic acid, tar, ketoconazole (an antifungal drug), or a combination of these substances.
      If shampooing is difficult, particularly if the scalp symptoms are severe or if shampooing doesn't help much then you may use a steroid lotion like hydrocortisone (a corticosteroid).
      Soapless cleansers may be used for affected skin areas: for example, Aquanil lotion or Cetaphil cleanser.
      If seborrheic dermatitis leads to conjunctivitis then treatment with eye drops or an eye ointment containing a corticosteroid may be needed.
      Rubbing mineral oil on the head of infants with a soft toothbrush, followed by a gentle shampooing will help treating Cradle Cap.

  43. QUESTION:
    my scalp is so itchy!?
    i dont have lice or fleas and im positive i dont!
    i wash my hair every 2 days
    and i have recently streaked my hair myself but it was itching before that

    im also taking Q silica tablets that are ment to assist in healthy hair and skin
    and my friend said they make your hair grow faster which indeed they dooo
    but my scalp started itching 2 weeks after i started taking them

    its incredibly itchy especially when im going to sleep at night
    PLEASE HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of itchy scalp include dry scalp, dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, scalp psoriasis, contact dermatitis, head lice infestation, ring worm of the scalp, tinea amiantacea, lichen planus, hair follicle inflammation, neurogenic excoriation and pyogenic infection of scalp. It is evident that no single shot remedy can effectively get rid of the scalp itching.

      Itchy scalp remedies include diagnosis of the specific underlying disease and general and specific measures of treatment according to the causes of itchy scalp.

      Diagnosis of Itchy Scalp
      This involves both clinical and laboratory diagnosis.

      General Measures to Get Rid of Scalp Itching
      Keep the scalp scale free with regular shampooing.
      Too much harsh shampooing should be avoided.
      Avoid drying hair lotions, tinctures etc.
      Take a well balanced diet, have sufficient sleep and do regular exercise.
      For moderate to severe itchy scalp, an antihistamine will help reduce the itching.

  44. QUESTION:
    Itchy scalp with red spots , any home recopies for treatment that work?
    my scalp is always itchy and loses hair i tried all sort of shampoos and hair treatment , ive been using SEBAMED soap for couple of years now kinda helped a bit but 3 months ago a had a severe sun burn mainly on scalp which caused more hair loss and since that sunburn my scalp become very sensitive with red spots and itches more and has the tendency to bleed when scratched ,
    i dont like to go to a doctor to give some chemical cream to use , any advice?

    • ANSWER:
      A solution of water and baking soda will relieve the itching, but that's just the symptom, not the underlying problem. This sounds like seborrheic dermatitis, more commonly known as cradle cap. A doctor will perscribe a shampoo containing ketoconazole, which should relieve the redness and hair loss.

  45. QUESTION:
    my son has a small bald patch after removing dandruff from his scalp?
    and I want to know how long it will take for the hair to grow back. All through preschool, I was told he had headlice, but my doctor said it was severe eczema. Well, I've tried showering his head, and even a cream on his scalp, and although the latter seems to help, I'm noticing a small bald spot about the size of a dime and want to know how long it will take to clear up.

    I'm tired of taking him to the doctor for every little thing that he gets and just want some sound advice on the issue, please.

    Thanks!
    zitdr...it's already been established by more than one doc in the same network that my son has severe lifelong eczema, but I will ask about having him referred to a dermatologist just to be sure.
    Nancy, I do treat it topically. I'm on the ball there, I just hate seeing that bald spot. It can be covered up with the rest of his hair, I just find it nerve racking that everytime I give him a shower or comb his hair, it's still bald after a month. My father thinks it's bugs biting him, but he never complains about being bitten or anything. I wanted to have his head shaved after the lice scare while in preschool, but no one would do it. Talk about suffering. He supposedly had lice 3 times in a row, and that was after all the treatments.

    • ANSWER:
      It would be prudent to make a correct diagnosis on your child, before instituting therapy. The patch could represent ring worm of the scalp, in which case, he'd need antifungal treatment. It also could represent an inflammatory condition (psoriasis or seborrheic dermatitis) for which a cortrisone preparation might be used. Or possibly even alopecia areata? And, then there are rarer conditions, too. Have your dermatologist take a look.

  46. QUESTION:
    what's up with my scalp?
    i'll go to scratch my head and there'll be little hardened flakes of skin. it feels like i'm picking off little scabs, except they don't hurt. sometimes they're even colored like scabs, but not often. i don't think it's psoriasis or dermatitis because it doesn't itch at all, and as far as i can tell there's no redness (i have long hair though, so i can't see too much of it). also, it seems like it's mainly at the front of my scalp, on the border where my hair stops growing, but i could be wrong about that. could it still be one of those diseases without those symptoms? what causes psoriasis and dermatitis? i think it might be because i only shower every couple of days, but then again it's the only part of my skin that's like that. i'm not really worried about any kind of health problem, it's just weird, and i want it to go away, or at least find out why it's like this. thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be Seborrheic Dermatitis. I was just diagnosed with this and figured I just didn't have good technique when applying shampoo. My hair just recently seemed to get itchy and I felt like I started losing hair, but I have often had a flaky scalp. I got lucky cause I see the dermatologist for mild acne and asked him about my scalp just in case. You should see a dermatologist, but you could just buy a strong shampoo. I'll tell you what the doctor told me:

      1.) Buy "Head & Shoulders Intensive Treatment". It is in a blue container and can be found in Walgreens, Walmart, and other shopping centers. (link to pic at bottom)
      2.) Use it daily for 6 weeks and don't use a conditioner during this time.

      Of course this is just the beginning treatment for my condition. If you can't see a dermatologist, even though you should, you can try this. Apparently my condition is currently severe, so your doctor could recommend something less drastic. Seborrheic Dermatitis can cause temporary hair loss that can get bad if it's not treated.

      My recommendation: ask you're parents to see a doctor if you're under 18, or schedule an appointment.

      It is fairly easy to treat, but the longer you wait, the worse it can get. SO SEE A DERMATOLOGIST!

  47. QUESTION:
    What do I do about my 3 month old daughters dry skin?
    I went to the doctor and he told us that my daughter has a skin condition called Seborrhea. To just give her an oil bath five minutes before a regular bath... I have but her skin is almost worse now. She got it from my husband, who suffers from severe dry patches and flare ups. I can't think of anything else. Does anyone know of a good soap or lotion that I can use? The doctor said that Johnson and Johnsons is fine, but isn't that fragranced? I just need to know if anyone has dealt with a baby with this, and how long I have to deal with this, cuz it's pretty bad.

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrheic dermatitis (cradle cap) is a common condition in babies and is usually temporary. It occurs on the scalp, and also frequently in the ears, creases of skin, eyelids, and other oily areas. It appears as yellowish or sometimes brownish scales, and if it advances it can even become weepy. It is an inflammatory reaction to dryness, so if it is a bad case often using a lotion is not sufficient. You need some type of anti-inflammatory lotion, oil, or ointment. More frequent bathing does not necessarily help as it can increase both dryness (from the warm water) and inflammation (from the scrubbing). Oiling her down before bath is a common prescription for treatment but does not necessarily help.

      My son had cradle cap over most of his body when he was around 4 months old. We had tried for weeks and multiple doctor visits and all sorts of lotions and potions, bathing more, bathing less, scrubbing, not scrubbing. It worsened and worsened until finally I was sent to the pediatric dermatologist. Almost 90% of my son's body was either scaly, red, irritated, inflamed, weeping, or all of the above. The dermatologist explained it, prescribed an ointment and an oil, and in ONE day my son's skin was about 80% better. All it took was having the right stuff. I would highly recommend that if your daughter's skin is bad, find a pediatric dermatologist right now. My regular pediatrician did not know how to treat this condition and three different doctors in the practice had given me instructions that directly conflicted with what the dermatologist told me would work. Good luck.

  48. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis & Swollen Glands?
    Hi, I've had Psoriasis on my scalp for about 12 yrs (I'm 26/Female) and never had success with treatments and just have to be careful with my shampoo but other than that never had any problems with it and it never bothered me until recently. It flared up really bad and is now moving down along my hairline onto my face, eyebrows and behind ears. Also around the same time I've developed two small lumps on my neck and on visiting a consultant last wk she told me their more than likely linked to my Psoriasis.

    I'm just wondering if anyone else can relate to this or had similar problems? I'm kinda finding it hard to convince myself that the lumps are connected to the Psoriasis.

    Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Scalp psoriasis is very common. In fact, at least
      half of all people who have psoriasis have it on
      their scalp. As with psoriasis elsewhere on the body,
      skin cells grow too quickly on the scalp and cause red
      lesions covered with scale.
      Scalp psoriasis can be very mild, with slight, fine
      scaling. It can also be very severe with thick, crusted
      plaques covering the entire scalp. Psoriasis can extend
      beyond the hairline onto the forehead, the back of the
      neck and around the ears. Most of the time, people
      with scalp psoriasis have psoriasis on other parts of
      their body as well. For some, the scalp is the only
      affected area.
      Other skin disorders, such as seborrheic dermatitis,
      may look similar to psoriasis. However, there are
      differences. Scalp psoriasis scales appear powdery with
      a silvery sheen, while seborrheic dermatitis scales often
      appear yellowish and greasy. Despite these differences,
      the two conditions can be easily confused.
      hoW is scalp psoriasis treated?
      Many treatment options can help control scalp
      psoriasis and its symptoms. Sometimes scalp psoriasis
      will clear on its own, or it can remain on the scalp for
      long periods.
      It is important to select scalp treatments that are
      agreeable to you. Treatments should never be worse
      than the psoriasis itself. Consider your lifestyle,
      available time and the cost to help you decide among
      the options.

  49. QUESTION:
    I have all these red, itchy bumbs on my scalp. They are very irratated. Anyone know what they are.?
    -Its not lice

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis can occur just on the scalp

      Key Points:
      Dry scaly patches are scattered on the scalp and look like patches of psoriasis seen elsewhere
      Mild involvement makes it difficult to separate this condition from seborrheic dermatitis or dandruff
      When mild, confirmation of the diagnosis requires looking at other parts of the body for changes of psoriasis, for example the elbows, knees, lower back and nails
      Scalp psoriasis can creep onto the forehead or the skin beyond the hairline
      In some, it is very itchy
      Treatment can be difficult in severe cases

      eczema :

      Atopic eczema (aka infantile e., flexural e., atopic dermatitis) is believed to have a hereditary component, and often runs in families whose members also have hay fever and asthma. Itchy rash is particularly noticeable on face and scalp, neck, inside of elbows, behind knees, and buttocks. Experts are urging doctors to be more vigilant in weeding out cases that are in actuality irritant contact dermatitis. It is very common in developed countries, and rising

      Could be one of these but check with your doctor first!

  50. QUESTION:
    skin problem?
    by default i ve combination skin but some times dry patches appear on it which r also a bit irritating. i apply moisturizer but but feel no results my skin became rough.is it becaue of any vitamine defficiency or only skin problem? what should i do?

    • ANSWER:
      Skin Rashes and Other Skin Problems

      The location, appearance and color of a rash will help your doctor make a diagnosis. Look for care suggestions on this chart for common rashes and other skin conditions. SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS SELF-CARE

      1. Is your face, chest or back covered in small, pus-filled sacs or pimples, blackheads or sore, red bumps? This may be ACNE, a common skin problem that often begins in adolescence. See your doctor if over-the-counter acne treatments, such as benzoyl peroxide, don't help. Gently washing your face with mild soap on a regular basis may be helpful. Sometimes prescription medicines, such as an antibiotic, may be prescribed by your doctor.

      2. Do you have a flushed appearance, perhaps with redness around your cheeks, chin, forehead or nose?
      This may be ROSACEA, a skin disease that affects the face.

      Treatment isn't usually needed, but antibiotics may be useful for moderate to severe symptoms.

      3. Do you have a painful red bump or a cluster of painful red bumps? This could be a BOIL. A cluster of boils is called a CARBUNCLE. These occur due to infection under the skin. Gently compress the boil with a warm cloth. Use antibiotic ointments if needed. Call your doctor if the boils don't come to a head, open and drain, or if the redness spreads.

      4. Do you have a small, boil-like infection around a hair shaft or pore? This could be FOLLICULITIS, an infection of the hair follicle. Most of these will heal on their own. Clean the area. Use antibiotic ointments if needed. See your doctor if the condition worsens or doesn't improve.

      5. Do you have red, tender and swollen areas of skin, perhaps around a cut or scrape? This could be CELLULITIS, an infection of the skin. Clean the area carefully with soap and water and apply an antibiotic ointment. Call your doctor if redness and pain increase.

      6. Do you have red, itchy bumps on your skin, and are they sprinkled randomly? These could be INSECT BITES. These aren't usually harmful. Use hydrocortisone cream, antihistamine and ice to relieve itching. If symptoms get worse or don't clear up, call your doctor. If new symptoms arise, such as difficulty breathing, dizziness or nausea, go to the emergency room right away.

      7. Do you have irregular, raised or flat red sores that appeared after taking medicine? This could be an ALLERGIC REACTION to the medicine. Call your doctor. Try an antihistamine for itching and rash.

      8. Have bumps formed suddenly on your face or body? These could be HIVES, a skin reaction to an allergen, medicine or infection. They can also appear in some people who are very nervous. Use an antihistamine and cool compresses for itching. If the hives don't go away on their own or are accompanied by other symptoms, such as swelling around the lips or trouble breathing, see your doctor or go to the emergency room right away.

      9. Do you have a red, itchy, scaly and oily rash, and does it affect the areas around your eyebrows, nose or the edge of your scalp? Go to Question 12.*

      10. Is the person an adult? This could be a sign of SEBORRHEIC DERMATITIS, a condition in which the sebaceous glands overproduce. Try using hydrocortisone cream or selenium sulfide shampoo on the sore areas. See your doctor if the symptoms continue or spread.

      11. Is the person a child and does the dry, scaly skin cover the head? This could be CRADLE CAP, a form of seborrhea in infants. Try gently scrubbing the scales to remove them. Hydrocortisone cream may also help. See your doctor if the rash doesn't go away or if the hair doesn't grow in that area.

      *12. Do you have a red, scaling rash, and did it begin after contact with clothing, jewelry or perfume? This could be IRRITANT CONTACT DERMATITIS. It's caused by a reaction to detergents, perfumes and other substances. Avoid whatever you think caused the symptoms and treat the area with hydrocortisone cream or other soothing lotions.

      13. Do you have a red, itchy rash, and are blisters forming? This could be ALLERGIC CONTACT DERMATITIS, caused by POISON IVY, poison oak or poison sumac. The oil from these plants causes an ALLERGIC REACTION. Wash the area with soap and water to remove any oil that remains on the skin. The rash will go away after about a week. To relieve itching, apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to the rash. See your doctor if the rash covers a large area of your body, does not go away, or if new symptoms, such as fever, appear .

      14. Are there red, swollen, tender bumps in your armpits or other areas where hair grows? This could be HIDRADENITIS SUPPURATIVA, inflammation of the sweat glands. See your doctor. Avoid using antiperspirants and deodorants.

      15. Do you have small red dots on your skin, or larger, bruise-like spots that appeared after taking medicine? This could be ALLERGIC PURPURA, a serious allergic reaction to a medicine, such as an antibiotic that can cause bleeding. See your doctor right away.

      16. Do you have a rash that started with a single scaly, red and slightly itchy spot, and within a few days, did large numbers of smaller patches of the rash, some red and others tan, break out over your chest and abdomen? This may be PITYRIASIS ROSEA. The causes aren't known. Check with your doctor. Calamine lotion and antihistamines may relieve itching and redness. The rash will probably go away in a few weeks. Pityriasis rosea doesn't usually respond to treatment.

      17. Do you have an intensely itchy rash with red bumps and blisters, and does it appear on your elbows, knees, back or buttocks? This may be DERMATITIS HERPETIFORMIS, a rash associated with a sensitivity to gluten, a protein found in cereal grains such as corn and wheat. See your doctor. Antibiotics can help control symptoms. Avoid foods that contain gluten.

      18. Do you have large, red bumps on your skin that seem to bruise, and are they tender to touch? This could be ERYTHEMA NODOSUM, possibly caused by an infection or reaction to a medicine. This condition usually isn't serious, but see your doctor to check for other diseases or causes of your symptoms.

      19. Do you have a white, scaly rash over red, irritated skin, possibly on your elbows and knees? This could be PSORIASIS, a condition caused by the overproduction of skin cells. See your doctor. Keep the skin moisturized. Your doctor may prescribe ointments, oral medications and/or light therapy, also called phototherapy, to treat the symptoms.

      20. Do you have a red, blotchy rash, with "target-like" sores or hives? This could be ERYTHEMA MULTIFORME, a common rash caused by strep throat, viral infections and reactions to medicines. See your doctor.

      21. Do you have a red rash that is raised on your forehead and face, then spreading to your neck, trunk and downward, and do you have a fever and sore throat? This could be MEASLES, a virus that often affects children. See your doctor right away. Make sure your child gets an MMR immunization to help prevent this disease. Be sure to keep the affected person away from pregnant women, as measles can lead to birth defects.

      22. Do you have multiple blisters on your face, chest and back, and spreading downward, along with a fever, cough, aches, tiredness and sore throat? This could be CHICKENPOX, a virus called varicella-zoster that most often affects children. See your doctor. Treat symptoms with acetaminophen, cold medicines and anti-itching creams, cool compresses and baths. A vaccine is available to prevent this disease.

      23. Do you have red blisters that are extremely painful and that may crust? This could be SHINGLES, a herpes-zoster viral infection of the nerves. See your doctor. Analgesics, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, and cool compresses may help.

      24. Is the person a child or an adult who had a fever and then developed a bright red rash covering the cheeks? This could be FIFTH DISEASE. Use cold medicines to treat symptoms. See your doctor if the rash is widespread or if you are pregnant.

      25. Do you have soft bumps forming that don't itch or cause other symptoms? These could be WARTS. PLANTAR WARTS appear on the feet. Warts also commonly appear on the hands. GENITAL WARTS appear in the genital area and are a type of sexually transmitted infection. For most warts, you can try over-the-counter treatments. If they don't work, see your doctor about freezing them off. If the warts appear in the genital area, see your doctor. These warts shouldn't be treated without your doctor's care.

      26. Do you have a bald spot on your scalp or a "ring" of itchy red skin anywhere on your body? This may be RINGWORM, a fungal infection that's most common in children. Treat with an antifungal cream and/or see your doctor.

      27. Do you have a rash that is red but not itchy and does it affect the palms of your hands or soles of your feet? This may be SYPHILIS, a sexually transmitted infection. See your doctor right away.

      28. Do you have a red, itchy rash that affects your groin area? This could be a fungal infection called JOCK ITCH in men, YEAST INFECTION in women, or DIAPER RASH in infants. Try an over-the-counter antifungal cream. If the rash doesn't go away, see your doctor. Women with irritation inside the vagina should first see their doctor before using over-the-counter yeast infection medicines.

      29. Is an area of your skin covered in light-colored patches? This may be TINEA VERSICOLOR, a discoloration caused by a fungus. Tinea versicolor can be treated with seleneum sulfide or an antifungal cream.

      30. Have crusted, tan-colored sores formed near your nose or lip? This could be IMPETIGO, a rash caused by a bacterial infection, such as strep or staph. See your doctor. Treatment usually involves an antibiotic cream or ointment and an oral antibiotic. The condition is very contagious, so wash your hands well to avoid infecting anyone else.

      31. Do you have bite-like sores that itch intensely, and that may have started on your hands, or between your fingers? This is a sign of SCABIES, an infestation of mites. Prescription medicine may be needed, along with washing clothing and bed coverings in hot water and detergent.

      32, Did a fine rash start on your arms and legs and also affect the palms of your hands and soles of your feet, and have you had a fever and headache? This could be ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER, a disease spread by ticks. See your doctor right away.

      33. Do you have a "butterfly" rash on your forehead and cheeks and do you have achy joints? This could be a symptom of LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, a severe, arthritis-like disease. See your doctor right away.

      34. Is your skin tinged yellow, and are the whites of your eyes and your mouth yellow? This could be JAUNDICE. It's common in newborns but can be a sign of HEPATITIS, a disease of the liver. See your doctor right away.

      35. Do you have a blue or black area on your skin, and did the discoloration occur after the area had been hit? This is probably a BRUISE. No treatment is usually necessary. Ice may slow the bleeding and swelling under the skin.

      36. Are there scaly, pink, gray or tan patches or bumps on your face, scalp or on the backs or your hands? This could be ACTINIC KERATOSES, a skin condition that can especially affect people with light skin who have been overexposed to the sun. See your doctor. Actinic keratoses may lead to skin cancer.

      37. Do you have a scar that has grown larger than expected? This may be a KELOID, an overgrown scar or HYPERTROPHIC SCAR. These are benign (non-cancerous) and may fade in time. See your doctor if you want the keloid removed, but surgery may cause more scar tissue to form. Keloids may be prevented by using a pressure dressing.

      38. Do you have a soft or rubbery growth? This may be a LIPOMA, a growth made up of fat cells. These aren't cancerous, but have them checked by your doctor. You can have a lipoma removed if it bothers you.

      39. Is the person a newborn and is the baby's face covered in small, white bumps? This may be MILIA, or baby acne. This condition usually clears up after the first few weeks of life and doesn't require treatment.

      40. Do you have small, firm, round bumps with pits in the center that may sit on tiny stalks? This may be MOLLUSCUM CONTAGIOSUM, bumps caused by a virus. See your doctor. These bumps are contagious and most common in children and teens. Early treatment helps prevent the spread.

      41. Do you have a bump with a white dome under your skin , perhaps on your scalp, nape of your neck or upper back? This may be a SEBACEOUS CYST, or blocked oil gland. These cysts aren't cancerous, but have them checked by your doctor to make sure of the diagnosis. Large cysts can be removed with surgery.

      42. Do you have a soft, fleshy growth, lump or bump, perhaps on your face, neck, armpits or groin? This may be a SKIN TAG. These are harmless, but if one gets irritated, you can have it removed.

      43. Do you have a yellow area under your skin, perhaps near your eyelids? This may be an XANTHELASMA, a fatty deposit. If it bothers you, see your doctor about having it removed.

      44. Is there a dark bump that may have started within a mole or blemish, or, is there a spot or mole anywhere on your skin that has changed in color, size, shape or is painful or itchy? This could be a MELANOMA, a type of skin cancer. See your doctor right away.

      45. Is there a fleshy, growing mass on or near your nose, eyes or other areas that have been exposed to the sun, such as your back or chest? This could be BASAL CELL CARCINOMA, the most common type of skin cancer. Have this checked by your doctor. This type of cancer is easily treated if caught early.

      46. Is there an unusual growth on your face, lip or chin that is red, scaly or crusted ? This could be SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA, a type of skin cancer. See your doctor right away.

      47. Are there dark or black raised spots anywhere on your skin that keep growing or have appeared recently? This could be KAPOSI'S SARCOMA, a serious type of skin cancer most common in people who have AIDS or other immune deficiencies. See your doctor right away


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